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BPI CO Best Practices Standards

I think this needs additional work and appreciate anyones input into this document.



Many thanks to the folks at carbonmonoxidekills.org for allowing us to use it.



ME
It's not so much a case of "You got what you paid for", as it is a matter of "You DIDN'T get what you DIDN'T pay for, and you're NOT going to get what you thought you were in the way of comfort". Borrowed from Heatboy.

Comments

  • MikeyB
    MikeyB Member Posts: 696
    Standards

    Hey Mark, I was wondering if you could clear this up for me, maybe im not reading it right , but under the heading "Standards for Action Levels"  the last sentence reads "The action levels are considered net indoor ambient readings, i.e. -indoor ambient minus outdoor ambient readings" So for example if we have a indoor ambient reading in a house of 15 ppm, and we were able to get a reading of 9 ppm in the outside air (before we enter the house) the reading we log down  for our indoor reading would be 6 ppm ambient, which would be a Normal reading for indoor ambient and would require "No Action"  Thanks again Mark
  • Mark Eatherton
    Mark Eatherton Member Posts: 5,839
    That is the way I read it Mike...

    And to be sure, I would write the OSA ambient down for reference, and do the math right there on the paper so there is no confusion.



    BTW, the highest ambient CO I have seen here in the Denver Basin, which is notorious for bad air inversions is 2 ppm.



    I confirmed this thru the Colorado Dept. of Health web site. 1.9 ppm is the max seen last year.



    If you were sampling down stream of a major CO producer (steel mill, coke factory) I suppose you could see higher than that tho...



    Food for thought.



    ME
    It's not so much a case of "You got what you paid for", as it is a matter of "You DIDN'T get what you DIDN'T pay for, and you're NOT going to get what you thought you were in the way of comfort". Borrowed from Heatboy.
  • Tim McElwain
    Tim McElwain Member Posts: 4,506
    DO NOT I REPEAT

    DO NOT set your outdoor ambient up near the exhaust from your service van or truck. Do not laugh it happens.
  • Mark Eatherton
    Mark Eatherton Member Posts: 5,839
    Good point....

    What ever happened to common sense?



    Funny thing. I inadvertently tested my personal CO detector the other day. Had it on my belt, back the Cherokee up to the house to start loading tools for a job, when suddenly, my rattler started rattling. What the? looked down and it was at 40 ppm. Set to begin buzzing at 35 ppm. Guess it works OKay!



    ME
    It's not so much a case of "You got what you paid for", as it is a matter of "You DIDN'T get what you DIDN'T pay for, and you're NOT going to get what you thought you were in the way of comfort". Borrowed from Heatboy.
  • MikeyB
    MikeyB Member Posts: 696
    edited March 2010
    Standards

    Great points Tim & Mark, I learn alot from you guys, thanks again for taking the time. Also under Best Practices for Domestic HW Tank CO Testing Draft Testing, they mention normal draft is between .01"WC & .02"WC, should this be written as a negative reading (-) ?
  • Mark Eatherton
    Mark Eatherton Member Posts: 5,839
    Affirmative....

    it is supposed to be listed as a NEGATIVE. (-). If it is positive, you have a "situation" on your hands.



    ME
    It's not so much a case of "You got what you paid for", as it is a matter of "You DIDN'T get what you DIDN'T pay for, and you're NOT going to get what you thought you were in the way of comfort". Borrowed from Heatboy.
This discussion has been closed.