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Refrigerant

johnjohn89
johnjohn89 Member Posts: 65
Why increase liquid pressure then lower vapor pressure?

Comments

  • Ironman
    Ironman Member Posts: 6,890
    I don’t understand your question.
    Bob Boan
    You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.
    mattmia2STEVEusaPA
  • STEVEusaPA
    STEVEusaPA Member Posts: 5,724
    You’re reading the chart incorrectly, or you’re misunderstanding the terminology.
    steve
    mattmia2
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 5,731
    Isn't that chart usually for confirmation of correct charge, not for charging?
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 12,137
    @johnjohn89

    It's all about the refrigeration cycle. Refrigerant vapor is pumped by the compressor (compressors can't pump liquid).

    The compressor pumps the refrigerant to a higher pressure and corresponding temperature that has to be a higher temperature than the outdoor ambient temperature (assuming and air-cooled condenser)

    When the refrigerant enters the condenser, it is cooled to a lower temperature, giving off heat (by air from the condenser fan blowing across the coil) but stays at the same pressure thus changing from a gas to a liquid.

    The liquid flows through the liquid line to the metering device (expansion valve, cap tube or restrictor) which reduces the pressure of the liquid and the liquid "boils" at around 40 degrees F for and air conditioner and then absorbs heat into the refrigerant in the evaporator coil.

    It then returns to the compressor and the cycle is repeated.

    There are You tube videos that can explain this better than I can. Go to you tube and look up "AC Service tech" and search his videos
  • pedmec
    pedmec Member Posts: 204
    charging chart for fixed metering device.
  • johnjohn89
    johnjohn89 Member Posts: 65
    @johnjohn89 It's all about the refrigeration cycle. Refrigerant vapor is pumped by the compressor (compressors can't pump liquid). The compressor pumps the refrigerant to a higher pressure and corresponding temperature that has to be a higher temperature than the outdoor ambient temperature (assuming and air-cooled condenser) When the refrigerant enters the condenser, it is cooled to a lower temperature, giving off heat (by air from the condenser fan blowing across the coil) but stays at the same pressure thus changing from a gas to a liquid. The liquid flows through the liquid line to the metering device (expansion valve, cap tube or restrictor) which reduces the pressure of the liquid and the liquid "boils" at around 40 degrees F for and air conditioner and then absorbs heat into the refrigerant in the evaporator coil. It then returns to the compressor and the cycle is repeated. There are You tube videos that can explain this better than I can. Go to you tube and look up "AC Service tech" and search his videos
    Ok thank u
  • johnjohn89
    johnjohn89 Member Posts: 65
    pedmec said:
    charging chart for fixed metering device.
    Ok thank u