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Plumbing a new wall toilet

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Comments

  • hankwylerjr
    hankwylerjr Member Posts: 105
    @Alan (California Radiant) Forbes thanks , I was worried about the set up didn't want to glue it yet. So the pitch is good from the wye to the vertical makes me happy. I added a clean up just in case. L glue it and keep everyone posted when it comes time to connect the other end to my special toilet. I'll also add a clean out up there as well thanks for all the help I'll be glue in the morning
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 12,661
    > @Alan (California Radiant) Forbes said:
    > A wye is better than a tee. Totally OK.

    Code allows you to use a wye to go from horizontal to vertical?
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 12,661
    As far as I'm aware that's a violation.
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • Alan (California Radiant) Forbes
    Alan (California Radiant) Forbes Member Posts: 3,186
    edited April 2020
    ChrisJ said:

    As far as I'm aware that's a violation.

    I believe the image is for a trap arm where air, coming down through the vent is important to prevent the trap from siphoning.





    In Hank's situation, the trap to the new toilet has (or should have) its own vent which will relieve any negative pressure that might cause the trap to be siphoned.
    Often wrong, never in doubt.
    rick in Alaska
  • hankwylerjr
    hankwylerjr Member Posts: 105
    @Alan (California Radiant) Forbes (will have a vent) I'm working my way up to that. I could tie into the current roof vent its 3 inches or simply run a new one for the upstairs toilet not sure if I can use existing that would be great
  • Charlie from wmass
    Charlie from wmass Member Posts: 4,214
    Tee wye for tieing into vertical stack. Should be shielded couplings interior of the building. Should be cast iron nohub tee wye in a cast iron stack to take the weight and provide uniform interior diameter alingment. Jmho as a 29 year licensed plumber. Oh and wax ring goes on the bowl not the closet flange. Also wall mount toilets use foam gaskets NOT wax rings.
    Cost is what you spend , value is what you get.

    cell # 413-841-6726
    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/charles-garrity-plumbing-and-heating
    STEVEusaPA
  • hankwylerjr
    hankwylerjr Member Posts: 105
    @Charlie from wmass ty, there is no weight but I triple strapped it just in case. There are old chains already holding it and that why I didn't care about using the steel couplers ferncos. Everything lined up perfectly with no movement whatsoever. I'm going to use a floor mounted rear discharge system pretty pricey.
  • Alan (California Radiant) Forbes
    Alan (California Radiant) Forbes Member Posts: 3,186
    edited April 2020
    Hank: Yes, you can tie into the existing 3" vent as long as you are 6" above the flood rim of the highest fixture.

    If the 3" vent serves only the toilet and the toilet bowl is 15" high, your tie-in point is 21" above the floor.

    The reason for this is if the drain line for the existing toilet gets clogged and backs up, it will flow through the new vent you just added if the tie-in is below the flood rim of the toilet. You may only realize what's going on after enough detritus build up in the 2" vent to finally clog it and cause a backup of the toilet. Removing the clog and cleaning the 2" vent will be difficult.
    Often wrong, never in doubt.
    hankwylerjr
  • BillyO
    BillyO Member Posts: 274
    a tee or a wye on a vertical line are both ok in NY at least
    hankwylerjrIntplm.
  • hankwylerjr
    hankwylerjr Member Posts: 105
    Ok I made it upstairs. Anyone can tell me best way to get this vertical ready to accept a rear discharge toilet? Maybe I should cut the 3 inch down to the rafters so I'll get the proper pitch. What fittings would I need. I'm going to tie into my 3 inch vent stack I'm assuming maybe right at the vertical? Thanks in advance. Have a happy Easter people
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 9,727
    edited April 2020
    IIWM, I would install the wall flange or carrier if needed in it's exact location.
    You have to consider the final floor thickness to set the height,
    this was discussed above so to have the flange at the exact height of the outlet of the floor sitting-wall discharge WC.
    (There is probably no forgiveness being too high or too low.)

    Also the wall thickness where the wall flange is.
    I would have a plywood backer flush with studs to secure the wall flange thru the finished wall. For now add temp spacers behind the flange to match the sheetrock ....probably 1/2" unless you want to tile the wall then add as needed. You would remove the spacers to rock around behind the flange.

    Then you have the height of the 3" DWV and length to your 3" drop pipe.
    hankwylerjr