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rad weight

jackchips_2
jackchips_2 Member Posts: 1,338
to know the weight of something I weigh myself on a scale first and then pick the item up.

You may need a large scale-for the radiator.

Jack

Comments

  • Timco
    Timco Member Posts: 3,026


    OK...

    We pulled all the rads from my rental today to have them sent out for sand-blasting. FOUR of us could barely move the largest ones. Any formula for rad weight? 3' high and 5' long? Averages?

    Tim

    To Learn More About This Professional, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Professional"
    Just a guy running some pipes.
  • Plumdog_2
    Plumdog_2 Member Posts: 873
    The exact wieght is

    > OK...

    >

    > We pulled all the rads from my rental

    > today to have them sent out for sand-blasting.

    > FOUR of us could barely move the largest ones.

    > Any formula for rad weight? 3' high and 5' long?

    > Averages?

    >

    > Tim

    >

    > _A

    > HREF="http://www.heatinghelp.com/getListed.cfm?id=

    > 387&Step=30"_To Learn More About This

    > Professional, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in

    > "Find A Professional"_/A_



  • John MacGregor_2
    John MacGregor_2 Member Posts: 32
    Rad weight

    Based on Burnham's Classic Radiator weights, which is 77#/3 sections of 9"x30" high radiation, your 36"x60" radiator should weigh over 627#. Considering that todays casting methods use less iron than earlier castings, yours are probably much heavier than the current models.
    John MacGregor
  • Tony Conner
    Tony Conner Member Posts: 549
    Think...

    ... about sub-contracting the rad handling to a furniture moving outfit. My brother's company did it that way. They've got the guys who are used to wrestling pianos up and down stairs, along with all of the rigs & tricks to go along with it.
  • CHARLES_4
    CHARLES_4 Member Posts: 61
    Radiator weights

    Personal experience has shown radiators come in 3 weights:
    heavy, real heavy and OMG heavy.
    Usually, your end will be heavier than the other end...
  • Empire_2
    Empire_2 Member Posts: 2,343
    I kind of think of it this way.

    After picking up only one end of that thing, try to guess how many toe's on 1 foot you could possibly bruise or lose. Multiply that # by .23066 and then again by the actual number of toes that twitch when you think of that. Now,...Multiply one more time by the total feet you have to carry that puppy and that should get you close....;-)
    Bottom line is thoes puppy's are HEAVY.....I hope someone smiled...;-)

    Have a great weekend All

    Mike T.
  • Timco
    Timco Member Posts: 3,026
    Just a guy running some pipes.
  • Dave Stroman
    Dave Stroman Member Posts: 761


    Knowing how much they weigh will not help when it comes time to move them. We have have come up with several tricks. Here is just one of them.

    Dave Stroman



    Dave Stroman
  • helper

    Not a bad idea, using the engine lift..
    As my father always tell me if I want to keep my job, keep my hands out of the pockets and look busy... Have a carpetner friend told me that guys walking around with their hands in their pockets are the first to go...
  • Dave Stroman
    Dave Stroman Member Posts: 761


    A common radiator as shown is 38" tall and 9" wide. Each section weighs about 38 lbs.

    Dave in Denver
    Dave Stroman
  • radiator weight

    Hi Tim,

    Our beloved "boss", the founder of the old supply house where I work, used a chart for radiator weights based on the radiator's square foot rating. Basically it went like this:

    thin tube radiators = 4.5 pounds per sq. ft. EDR

    Aero or tube radiators = 6 pounds per sq. ft. EDR

    column radiators = 7 pounds per sq. ft.

    Example: a 10 section 3 column 38 high radiator has 50 sq. ft. EDR, 5 sq. ft. per section. So 50 sq. ft. times 7 pounds would equal 350 pounds

    Happy lifting!

    Best regards, Pat
This discussion has been closed.