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Primary and secondary pumps for zone valves?

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I'm finishing up my boiler install. I replaced my munchkin boiler with a aquaBalance. My old boiler only had one calculator pump. Based on the diagrams from the aquabalance it shows a primary and secondary pump. I set it up this way. I have not pressed the pipes yet so I figured I would see if someone could help me out. From the picture you can see I have two currently

setup. I also have a zone valve setup for an indirect tank in the future. Do I need to have two pumps in this system? If so how would I wire the second pump since Im not using a zone switching relay.
THanks

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  • GGross
    GGross Member Posts: 1,105
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    First thing correct the system pump install orientation





  • Ironman
    Ironman Member Posts: 7,399
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    The boiler has a water tube heat exchanger which has a high resistance to flow. It must have its own circulator and be piped p/s.

    Both circulators should be powered on a call for heat when the end switch closes on a zone valve.

    Most mod/cons, if not all, are setup for an indirect which should be piped off of the boiler, not the house loop, with a separate circulator. Doing it the way you’re planning would make it difficult to setup ODR.

    All wet rotor circulators MUST be installed with the motor horizontal to insure proper lubrication f their bearings.
    Bob Boan
    You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.
    GGross
  • jakethomas
    jakethomas Member Posts: 9
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    GGross said:

    First thing correct the system pump install orientation





    Thanks for the replies

    The reason the pump is sitting like that is because the pipes are not pressed yet. It cant hold the weight of the motor up in the correct position.

    Iron man,
    Two things, do you think I should plumb the in direct close to the manifold? I figured the way im doing it now would heat the indirect when its called. So its acting just like a zone.

    So if I leave both pumps, do I just tie both pumps to come on together when heat is needed?(power could be applied to both from the boiler?)
    GGross
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 9,970
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    I'd strongly recommend using a better air eliminator. Use a microbubble separator instead of an air scoop.

    Both circualtors can be called off the boiler. Probably would set them up with the "boiler pump" connection if you have the indirect and the dh zones on the same circulator. Make sure the relay in the boiler can handle both circulators together.

    The end switch on the dhw zone would call the dhw instead of the dh on the boiler. Set the boiler up to turn on the boiler circulator on either call.
    hot_rodMad Dog_2
  • Ironman
    Ironman Member Posts: 7,399
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    First thing correct the system pump install orientation
    Thanks for the replies The reason the pump is sitting like that is because the pipes are not pressed yet. It cant hold the weight of the motor up in the correct position. Iron man, Two things, do you think I should plumb the in direct close to the manifold? I figured the way im doing it now would heat the indirect when its called. So its acting just like a zone. So if I leave both pumps, do I just tie both pumps to come on together when heat is needed?(power could be applied to both from the boiler?)
    Have you consulted the I/O manual that came with the boiler? Almost every one that I’ve seen for a mod/con calls for the indirect to be teed into the supply and return at the boiler with its own circulator. The boiler control may not allow you to operate the pumps the way you’re planning during a domestic call.

    Also, as I stated, you may have trouble incorporating the ODR function to work properly with what you’re attempting.

    Do you know what the ODR function is and how it works?
    Bob Boan
    You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.
    Mad Dog_2
  • jakethomas
    jakethomas Member Posts: 9
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    I have seen the manual on how they recommend doing it. The easy up manifold doesn't come with an adapted port for the dhw. I would have to cut the manifold and T into it. The manual does state I can use DHW tank as a zone. It just has to have priority control.
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 22,491
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    The indirect as a parallel zone is best, it will work as a secondary zone also. Its nice if you can go direct from boiler to tank with 1'' tube for max performance.
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream