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UPDATE: Kit on the way! ...Wanted Test Equipment Oil Burner/Hot Water Boiler

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ww
ww Member Posts: 282
edited January 2023 in Buy, Sell, Barter
I would prefer a Bacharach kit with all needed including smoke tester, draft gauge and the rest in the kit. In addition a pump pressure gauge...Please let me know what you have. Thanks!

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  • STEVEusaPA
    STEVEusaPA Member Posts: 6,505
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    Why would you want a wet kit? Lacks important data you need, and would get, from an electronic analyzer.
    If it’s not for everyday use, there are some pretty basic, less expensive ones.

    There was an error rendering this rich post.

  • Mad Dog_2
    Mad Dog_2 Member Posts: 7,103
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    Steve is right. I would get a NEW Bacharach or Testo combustion analyser and a manual pull 10 pull smoke tester with the white paper strips.  Shop for a deal but buy new. Mad 🐕 Dog
    Long Beach Ed
  • DJD775
    DJD775 Member Posts: 252
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    Here are a few combustion analyzers at a lower entry point. The UEI detects CO2 by IR spectroscopy (may be better for infrequent use) and the TPI has the standard electrochemical O2 sensor.
    https://www.valuetesters.com/uei-c161-flue-gas-combustion-analyzer-eos-technology.html
    https://www.valuetesters.com/tpi-dc710c1-flue-gas-analyzer.html
  • pecmsg
    pecmsg Member Posts: 4,883
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    You might want to get training before spending all that money.

    http://nationalcomfortinstitute.com/pro/index.cfm?pid=943
    DJD775Derheatmeister
  • PC7060
    PC7060 Member Posts: 1,173
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    The TPI is very easy to configure and use; Bluetooth connection to smart phone via app.  Cost is around $420 new. 
  • Long Beach Ed
    Long Beach Ed Member Posts: 1,211
    edited January 2023
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    Some occasional users opt for the wet kits due to their longevity. If you're only servicing a few burners, the annual calibration and required sensor replacement gets pricey. The old Bacharach kits can serve for decades without added expense. But you really need a CO tester to go with your wet kit...
  • Mad Dog_2
    Mad Dog_2 Member Posts: 7,103
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    NCI does great training. Jim Davis is the CO Legend. Mad Dog 🐕 
    GGross
  • ww
    ww Member Posts: 282
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    I looked into this regarding what type of equipment I would get...Long Beach Ed took the words right out of my mouth...The Bacharach kit I looked at includes the CO tester. I do agree about other comments as well and after mastering this will continue to look more into other equipment.
  • MaxMercy
    MaxMercy Member Posts: 514
    edited January 2023
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    I know my answer will be as welcome here as a fart in church, but if you're only taking care of your own boiler, a wet kit is a reasonable option. They're cheap, they're easily and cheaply renewed, they're accurate within a quarter percent give or take, and they will never need expensive calibration and sensor replacements (which need to be done by age, not tests taken). Wet kits work by chemical reaction, so they will maintain their accuracy (what accuracy they have anyway) forever. One of my friends is a master plumber and he keeps a wet kit on his truck to verify his Testo if he should ever get a suspicious reading with it or if it suffers a failure.

    Downsides are wet kits don't test for CO and they take much longer to get a single reading, and every adjustment you make to the burner requires another manual test where an electronic tester reads on the fly so adjusting burners is a lot faster with no hit-or-miss involved. A pro wouldn't use a wet kit these days other than for back up but for a homeowner they're good enough.

    You could pick up a Bacharach wet kit with the excellent MZF draft gauge and a smoke tester for a hundred or less.

    EDIT: I just checked ebay and for some reason, these wet kits are bringing more money than they used to. Check your local facebook marketplace, I picked up my kit for $70 a couple of years ago.
    rick in AlaskaEdTheHeaterMan
  • ww
    ww Member Posts: 282
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    Thanks MaxMercy...A Bacharach kit is on the way...and has all the things I need as you mentioned!
    MaxMercy
  • seized123
    seized123 Member Posts: 297
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    ww, if you happen to read this, how do you like your Bacharach test kit? I am pondering that vs digital, solely for personal home use.
  • EdTheHeaterMan
    EdTheHeaterMan Member Posts: 8,068
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    seized123 said:

    ww, if you happen to read this, how do you like your Bacharach test kit? I am pondering that vs digital, solely for personal home use.

    I'm a professional that learned the trade in the 1970s. The first combustion analyser we used was manufactured by Lynn Products and it was a couple thousand dollars back then. F P Young had as many as 20 service trucks and they all had to have a wet kit. I learned on the Dwyer wet kit. The Bacharach Wet Kit was the Cadillac for me. I eventually saved up enough to get one. Once I started to hire mechanics, I had to supply that kit for each technician. I was very happy with the durability and performance. For the 2 or 3 times a year that you are going to use it. I believe it is your best value.

    I agree with @MaxMercy on this point.


    Edward Young Retired

    After you make that expensive repair and you still have the same problem, What will you check next?

    MaxMercy
  • seized123
    seized123 Member Posts: 297
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    Thanks, EdTheHeaterMan, also MaxMercy. 
    It sounds like wet is the way to go. I still do get tempted by the cheaper used electronic ones on ebay (The Bacharach Fyrite Tech 24-7236 seems available for less than $200, and the UEI for $350 that you provided the link for) but the two things that dissuade me are that 1) buying used I don’t know what I’m getting (would I have to pay to get it calibrated right off the bat, and how much is that?) and 2) having to replace sensors every year or two.

    Most of the wet kits on eBay that look in good physical condition seem to run around $250, but I’m sure a visit from my oil company just to take readings and make adjustments would cost that or more. (Having said that, even if I get the kit and begin to learn to use it, I will not hesitate to call a pro when I’m in doubt, or after the first time or two to verify my results or see what adjustments they make.)

    If I get the wet kit, should I also be looking at something to test CO? Any suggestions would be welcome.

    Also would love to hear from ww about his experience with the wet kit.
  • EdTheHeaterMan
    EdTheHeaterMan Member Posts: 8,068
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    If @ww is like me, when I was at the 200 to 400 posts, I was working and did not have time to play on HeatingHelp.com. As a professional I used it to get answers to stuff I found at customers homes that I was not familiar with. This place was a great resource. After getting the answers I needed, I would pay it forward by answering some of the queries I was proficient with. But that was all the time I could give.

    Now that I'm retired, I have nothing better to do but bother everyone on this site with some of my experiences, but more Wit than Wisdom. It is unlikely that you will here from him until he has another question. You could try to Private Message ww. That may send him an email that he may answer.

    Mr. Ed

    Edward Young Retired

    After you make that expensive repair and you still have the same problem, What will you check next?

    MikeAmann