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Zone Question

Cackster
Cackster Member Posts: 13
edited November 2022 in Plumbing
Thanks for any clarification!

Comments

  • Cackster
    Cackster Member Posts: 13
    edited November 2022
    Thanks!
  • EdTheHeaterMan
    EdTheHeaterMan Member Posts: 6,019
    edited November 2022
    Connect the supply side to the new zone radiators or baseboards or whatever heat emitters you choose. Connect the return side of the radiators to the unused return pipe on the manifold. Once you are sure there are no leaks in the new zone, then you can open the valves on both the supply and return.

    When the system is under pressure, unless you can turn off both sides of the section. you wish to work on, there will be pressure on the system form the other side that has no valve or an open valve.

    Think of it like a big circle. Water can get to both sides of the same valve since the valve is only one point on the circle. You need to have 2 shut off valves in order to isolate a section of the circle.

    Edward F Young. Retired HVAC ContractorSpecialized in Residential Oil Burner and Hydronics
  • pecmsg
    pecmsg Member Posts: 4,172
    If you're going to solder drain everything.
    If you have access to a propress than you can take the pressure off and clamp a new valve on.
    Cackster
  • Cackster
    Cackster Member Posts: 13
    edited November 2022

    Connect the supply side to the new zone radiators or baseboards or whatever heat emitters you choose. Connect the return side of the radiators to the unused return pipe on the manifold. Once you are sure there are no leaks in the new zone, then you can open the valves on both the supply and return.

    When the system is under pressure, unless you can turn off both sides of the section. you wish to work on, there will be pressure on the system form the other side that has no valve or an open valve.

    Think of it like a big circle. Water can get to both sides of the same valve since the valve is only one point on the circle. You need to have 2 shut off valves in order to isolate a section of the circle.

    Interesting. A plumber friend explained that I can remove the propress cap on the return side without fear of water coming out so long as the supply side valves are all closed. He used the example of filling a straw with water, and plugging one end with your finger and then lifting it out of solution. The water will stay in the straw even though the other end is open because of the suction created by your finger (aka the ball valves on the supply side). His theory made sense to me given once you close the ball valves on the supply side of all the zones, you isolate them from the pressure of the boiler and they act like the finger on the straw, enabling you to open the return without water rushing out. I could be totally wrong though- just going on what he said. Appreciate the insight!
  • pecmsg
    pecmsg Member Posts: 4,172
    Yes, in theory. like holding the end of a straw.

    1 small leak and you're going to have a mess to clean up
    CacksterMikeAmann
  • Cackster
    Cackster Member Posts: 13
    pecmsg said:

    Yes, in theory. like holding the end of a straw.

    1 small leak and you're going to have a mess to clean up

    that makes total sense. One small leak in the system anywhere, and that will let the water flow. Thanks for clarifying!!