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Heat transfer plate options for 1/2"

What are some of best heat transfer plate options available at the moment for 1/2" pex between joist radiant installs?

If it matters I think I am considering 4' or 2' lengths. What design seems to extract and spread the heat the best into 1-5/8" wood subfloor/underlay?

Comments

  • Paul Pollets
    Paul Pollets Member Posts: 3,570
    The 4' heavy duty plates made by Uponor or Viega are recommended. With a 15/8" subfloor you're at the limit of output for a staple-up application. I'd make sure you do a careful heat loss to make sure you won't need supplemental heating, which will depend on the climate and the insulation values of the home.
    GGrossMarvin007kcopp
  • Marvin007
    Marvin007 Member Posts: 52
    I'll have to double check my subfloor+underlay that was rough guess. It may actually be 1-3/8".
  • Paul Pollets
    Paul Pollets Member Posts: 3,570
    You're still at the limit with 13/8" total floor thickness. Supplemental heat will usually be required in most northern climes.
  • Ironman
    Ironman Member Posts: 7,083
    We like these from Rehau:


    Bob Boan
    You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 18,239
    If this will be the primary heating, I would first do a room by room heat load calc. Mid to high 20’s for btu output, assuming no more r value over the floor like carpet or throw rugs.
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
  • Marvin007
    Marvin007 Member Posts: 52
    hot_rod said:
    If this will be the primary heating, I would first do a room by room heat load calc. Mid to high 20’s for btu output, assuming no more r value over the floor like carpet or throw rugs.
    Is there an online calculator or good video that explains how to do a heat load calculation?
  • Marvin007
    Marvin007 Member Posts: 52
    edited November 2022
    The 4' heavy duty plates made by Uponor or Viega are recommended. With a 15/8" subfloor you're at the limit of output for a staple-up application. I'd make sure you do a careful heat loss to make sure you won't need supplemental heating, which will depend on the climate and the insulation values of the home.
    What is the difference between a heavy duty plate and average plate?



    is the heat transfer between these 2 plates drastically different?

    These are $20.50 CAD per 4’ plate retail at Andrew Sheret
    https://www.uponor.com/en-ca/s/joist-trak-1-2-heat-transfer-panel-a5080500

    These are approx. $2.25 a 4’ plate.
    https://m.vevor.ca/floor-heating-mat-c_10381/100pcs-4-aluminum-radiant-floor-heat-transfer-plates-for-1-2-pex-tubing-p_010932034185?gclid=CjwKCAiA68ebBhB-EiwALVC-NkSivivMXtEoog1FczCzMiMAiMqRtc9udNUZcJrKwwmtcdka4M0tpBoCzLEQAvD_BwE

  • kcopp
    kcopp Member Posts: 4,092
    Yes... there are 1/8" thick extruded plates and "beer can" plates. The extruded plates hold the heat and transfer the temperature to the floor much better. typically, you can run the water temperature lower w/ the extruded plates. It makes for a more efficient system.



  • Marvin007
    Marvin007 Member Posts: 52
    edited November 2022
    kcopp said:
    Yes... there are 1/8" thick extruded plates and "beer can" plates. The extruded plates hold the heat and transfer the temperature to the floor much better. typically, you can run the water temperature lower w/ the extruded plates. It makes for a more efficient system.
    Is this a 1/8” thick extruded plate? If not can you give an example of one. 
    https://www.uponor.com/en-ca/s/joist-trak-1-2-heat-transfer-panel-a5080500
  • These are the only plates I ever used. 
    https://radiantdesignandsupply.com/productsthermofin 
    Whichever one you get, look at their engineering which will tell you the heat output of the plates at different water temperatures. Within limits, the lower the water temperature, the more you boiler will condense. 
    Rummage through the Slantfin website for their Explorer heat loss program. 


    8.33 lbs./gal. x 60 min./hr. x 20°ΔT = 10,000 BTU's/hour
    Marvin007