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EK1 / System 2000 Hot Water Tank Leak

peteonly
peteonly Member Posts: 7
edited October 2022 in Plumbing
Hi All,
I have an EK1 with a 40 gallon hot water tank. The tank is leaking somewhere on top. There is water puddling in the cold water intake and also in a recess next to it. I can't really tell which. Any suggestions how to tell which or if anything to try and fix? Hoping someone knows the internals of this.



THANKS for any help or suggestions,
Pete

Comments

  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 13,101
    Hard to tell the only thing you can do is dry it up and try and find where it is leaking.
  • Larry Weingarten
    Larry Weingarten Member Posts: 2,782
    Hi, Check every threaded fitting on top. If none of those are leaking, the tank is a goner.
    Yours, Larry
  • peteonly
    peteonly Member Posts: 7
    Thanks for the responses! I checked the fitting and that's not where its leaking from. :(
    It's like the leak is where the nipple comes out of the tank I think.
    Can you tell me what's the fitting to the right of the cold outlet? Anything I can check there?
  • Larry Weingarten
    Larry Weingarten Member Posts: 2,782
    Hi, That fitting is the top of the sacrificial anode rod, probably aluminum. You'll want a 1-1/16" socket to unscrew it if needed. You want to check the lower end of the pipe nipples where they screw into the tank too. This often means cutting or bending back the sheet metal cover and cutting away the foam. Then use a dry rag to completely dry things and watch where any water comes from. If you keep getting water while the fittings themselves are dry, it has to be the tank. :|

    Yours, Larry
  • HVACNUT
    HVACNUT Member Posts: 4,858
    Its definitely not from the cold inlet? The brass fitting and Blue tephlon tape are dry? Can you raise the rubber escutcheon around the cold inlet and cut away some insulation?
    How old is the tank?
    Has the anode ever been checked?
    Municipal or well water?
    STEVEusaPA
  • pecmsg
    pecmsg Member Posts: 3,535

    Hi, That fitting is the top of the sacrificial anode rod, probably aluminum. You'll want a 1-1/16" socket to unscrew it if needed. You want to check the lower end of the pipe nipples where they screw into the tank too. This often means cutting or bending back the sheet metal cover and cutting away the foam. Then use a dry rag to completely dry things and watch where any water comes from. If you keep getting water while the fittings themselves are dry, it has to be the tank. :|

    Yours, Larry

    Find someone with a good impact gun, that's not coming out without a struggle!
  • peteonly
    peteonly Member Posts: 7
    I see the aluminum cover has some nuts. I was going to try and remove the cover so I could try and spot the source if the leak. Not sure if the cover comes off that easy? But I have to think of a way to isolate the source of the leak. I may also try and removing the cold water nipple and teflon it and reinsert. Not sure it will come out either but will see. I will post what happens.
    The tank is about 12 years old. We have a well system and water is pretty hard. I have one of those aqua pure filters on the system to help.

    Everyone has been helpful - THANKS.
  • rick in Alaska
    rick in Alaska Member Posts: 1,396
    The cold water nipple on those tanks have a short dip tube connected to it, so you need to make sure the whole thing comes out. Most likely the top is stuck on to the tank when they foam it, so you will be bending a lot of the top to remove it. It is easier to take a pair of tin snips and cut the hole bigger around the nipple, then dry it out and watch it to see where the water is coming from.
    Rick
  • peteonly
    peteonly Member Posts: 7
    Thanks, good idea about making holes larger.
    Worst case scenario and I need a new tank. Is there a non-EK tank I can buy and install myself? I've read other posts where people say its possible but no details. If I know a name/model of a replacement tank I think I can do it. Any info/help would be great.
  • rick in Alaska
    rick in Alaska Member Posts: 1,396
    You can use any electric tank, but the EK tank uses a shorter dip tube. I believe you can go on their site and they will give you the particulars on how long to make it.
    Rick
  • Larry Weingarten
    Larry Weingarten Member Posts: 2,782
    Hi @peteonly , One interesting tidbit is that I see no water in the depression around the hot outlet pipe. This means water is not traveling that far. It hints at the possibility of the leak being in the threaded portion of the cold nipple. I'd start there, drying things and simply watching where water comes from. I've dealt with lots of leaking tanks, and my experience is that if it's a tank leak, all fittings on top of the tank get wet. That said, the condition of the anode is still your best clue about conditions inside of the tank.

    Yours. Larry
  • peteonly
    peteonly Member Posts: 7
    Unexpected great news. Out of curiosity I called EK and asked about the tank. I provided them the model and serial number and it's still under warranty (barely). I am at 11.5 years since installed. So the tank will be replaced and I pay for labor. I was so surprised. The rep did say that once the new one is installed it has no further warranty. I thought that was interesting.
    Thanks again for all for your help and comments. GREATLY appreciated. Everyone is awesome!

    Pete
    SuperTech
  • heatdoc1
    heatdoc1 Member Posts: 14
    Hi @Peteonly, when the tank is replaced I would recommend checking the anode rod to see what condition it is in. There are multiple factors that could cause a tank to fail such as inadequate grounding or bonding but the most common is galvanic corrosion. The anode rod is a sacrificial rod that protects your tank. When they check the anode rod in your current tank it if it is highly deteriorated or gone I would recommend having it checked annually to extend the life of your new tank.
    John Ringel
    Senior Technical Support Specialist
    Energy Kinetics
    Larry Weingarten
  • peteonly
    peteonly Member Posts: 7
    Thanks John. I will check in that. Would be good to know. 

    THANKS ALL for great help
    Pete
  • peteonly
    peteonly Member Posts: 7
    Hi John from EK - can I check the anode annually myself? Easy to do?
    Also, is there any info/guide/manual for preventative maintenance I can reference for my EK1?
    I thought I remember something about flushing the plate exchanger occasionally or something like that.
    Thanks,
    Pete
  • heatdoc1
    heatdoc1 Member Posts: 14
    @peteonly yes you can check change the anode rod yourself but for safety reasons you should have a professional on site at least once to show you how. They may be willing to do this for you at the time of installation. In regards to backflushing the plate exchanger that should be done at least once a year. You need to shut the valve under the tank circulator and open the valve above it. Make sure to note the position of the valve so you can put back the way it was as that valve is used to set the water temperature in the tank.
    John Ringel
    Senior Technical Support Specialist
    Energy Kinetics
    szwedj