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Rebuild old Trane Vapor Radiator Valve?

SeanBeans
SeanBeans Member Posts: 494
Do they sell rebuild kits for the valves here?

Comments

  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 19,427
    You mean here on the Wall? No. But Barnes & Jones can tell you the correct replacement cage for that trap, no problem. Use a hex wrench (you may not have clearance for a socket wrench) to get the cap off. Don't use a pipe wrench.

    What's the matter with the valve? There isn't much in there which should need rebuilding.
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
  • SeanBeans
    SeanBeans Member Posts: 494
    There are 5 original valves that won't turn anymore. They are stuck open. 

    I'm not sure if I should try to rebuild the valves or 
    replace them 
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 19,427
    OK, fair enough. I'd see if I could get them to turn. Take the handle off and get some penetrating oil on the shaft. Put the handle back on and try to shift it back and forth. No luck? Not surprised... next step takes a bit of courage. Two high quality open end wrenches, one on the cover hex, one on the hex on the bottom of the valve body. Squirt some penetrating oil (Pb Blaster or the like) where the cover meets the body. Now remove the cover. Before you try to take anything inside apart, take photos! Those things have an adjustable metering sleeve inside, and you want to get it back the way it was. Be gentle, intelligent, and firm, and you can get them apart. Then clean up all the mating and sliding surfaces -- they will be very slightly corroded, but just clean them. Brake cleaner, perhaps, and perhaps very fine polishing cloth. Put it back together and carry on..
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 5,999
    Didn't someone have a video of taking these valves apart?
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 5,999
    PC7060
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 19,427
    Thank you @mattmia2 ! One comment -- it's not necessary to take the valve body off the riser or the radiator to do the work.
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
  • SeanBeans
    SeanBeans Member Posts: 494
    Is there a @tunstall rep here that would know the part number to order for the above video? 

    I called them today and sent them photos and they recommended the MAC-RSTR EZ-Fit conversion kit.

    my question is.. because I'm immpatient.. is can I use that kit and still have a regular handle on top? Or do I have to use some type of "operator" such as the MaC-EVO-Z(recommended by them)
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 5,999
    edited September 13
    I think unless it is the bellows type and the bellows are broken you should be able to clean it up and rebuild with generic parts if you are careful. I would get a socket to fit that bonnet. I think it needs to be 12 point because it is octagonal.
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 19,427
    SeanBeans said:

    Is there a @tunstall rep here that would know the part number to order for the above video? 


    I called them today and sent them photos and they recommended the MAC-RSTR EZ-Fit conversion kit.

    my question is.. because I'm immpatient.. is can I use that kit and still have a regular handle on top? Or do I have to use some type of "operator" such as the MaC-EVO-Z(recommended by them)
    At this point I'm almost hopelessly confused, @SeanBeans . Are you addressing the valve at the top of the radiator, or the trap at the bottom of the radiator? It seems to be the valve at the top, if you are talking about adding an operator and all that. As @mattmia2 said, the simplest and quickest and best thing to do is to take it apart -- as in the video -- and replace what few items might be worn, such as the washer or the packing. There's nothing in there which a really good hardware store or helpful plumbing supply house wouldn't have on hand.

    What am I missing?
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England