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B&G control valve elimination

okhan
okhan Member Posts: 9
I want to clean up my boiler. I was told by a heating & cooling contractor long ago that my system setup no longer requires the B&G flow control valve. It has started dripping last winter so I want to eliminate it. In handy with the torch and doing the work but not sure if I simply replace the valve with a t? Boiler output comes through the bottom of valve, one side exits to the zone valves and the other to the expansion tank. I’ll upload some photos.

Comments

  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 6,713
    You can replace it with a tee or an ell and move the expansion tank somewhere else. I assume this boiler has a circulator pumping in to it from the return which means it is also pumping in to the expansion tank. The expansion tank would be better on the return before the circulator so the pressure from the circulator isn't pushing in to the tank.
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 12,671
    Looks like you have 2 zones that have zone valves. If that is true you can eliminate the B& G flow check valve and replace it with a tee.
  • okhan
    okhan Member Posts: 9
    The boiler does have the circulator on the return side. 2 zone valves and one old school t stat valve. So I’d have to move the expansion tank and solder elbow in place of the B&G…expansion tank before the pump on the return is preferable?
  • okhan
    okhan Member Posts: 9
    Could I just leave the tank where it is and sweat the tee in place of the valve?
  • Jersey2
    Jersey2 Member Posts: 133
    I suppose you can get another control valve and keep everything as is. I saw that Ebay has them on the cheap side:
    B&L 107018

    B&L 107018 free shipping
    I'm not a plumber or hvac man and my thoughts in comments are purely for conversation.
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 12,671
    just take out the valve and install the tee. you will be fine no need to move the pump. leave it as is. just reconnect the expansion tank to the new tee.
    okhan
  • okhan
    okhan Member Posts: 9
    Thanks for the advice. I’ll sweat a tee in place of the valve. 
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 17,568
    Have you had any noise or air problems since the zone valves were installed?
    Got a pic from a step back to see them entire boiler piping?

    Since you will be draining down it would be an option to move them pump or expansion tank connection. It could be fairly simple to do. A delta P circulator would be a nice upgrade also.

    B&G has been explaining to importance of proper expansion tank location for 60 years or so now.
    But what do theyn know :)
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
  • Jersey2
    Jersey2 Member Posts: 133
    Doesn't the one way valve prevent water from pumping into the expansion tank? With a T the expansion tank should probably be moved, no?
    I'm not a plumber or hvac man and my thoughts in comments are purely for conversation.
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 12,671
    No. The valve only allows flow to the system when the pump runs. The expansion tank is connected to the boiler at all times through that valve
    mattmia2
  • MikeAmann
    MikeAmann Member Posts: 646
    mattmia2 said:

    You can replace it with a tee or an ell and move the expansion tank somewhere else. I assume this boiler has a circulator pumping in to it from the return which means it is also pumping in to the expansion tank. The expansion tank would be better on the return before the circulator so the pressure from the circulator isn't pushing in to the tank.

    Not to hijack, but my circulator is on the boiler return, pumping into the boiler and expansion tank. I only have one zone, and this works fine. I also like my circulator being on the front of the boiler for easy servicing, so it's not going to be moved. But my expansion tank is in the way and I would mind moving it. Is it OK to move just the expansion tank to the to the return before the circulator? Thanks.

  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 12,671
    @MikeAmann yes you can move it to the return. In fact, Weil McLain shows it on the return in some of their install drawings
    MikeAmann
  • okhan
    okhan Member Posts: 9
    My boiler has been improperly plumbed for God knows how long and it’s worked fine all these years. Is it the best layout…no but it’s been heating the house for the past 30 + years just fine. So I wouldn’t worry too much about placement unless of coarse you have problems or are installing a new boiler. Just isn’t worth the time & money to most likely end up with the same results.
  • jumper
    jumper Member Posts: 1,908
    hot_rod said:

    Have you had any noise or air problems

    B&G has been explaining to importance of proper expansion tank location for 60 years or so now.
    But what do theyn know :)

    Oh manufacturers & suppliers know lots; but their business is to sell stuff. Especially stuff that eventually needs to be replaced. Modern Xtanks is sweet example.

  • leonz
    leonz Member Posts: 619
    Why not just repack it and not worry about it?

    You can repack it by removing the threaded top,
    install a new gasket and then open it up fully and
    avoid all that extra work.