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High-Temp Painting Cast Iron Boiler?

FredoSP
FredoSP Member Posts: 79
Hello Forum,

I'm looking to clean up the ugly looking rust on the front of my Peerless cast iron boiler. Would anyone know if it's okay to use a high temperature spray paint on this? I was thinking of purchasing a Rust-Oleum product in matte black that deals with high heat situations.

I'm a little OCD :p and also if the tankless starts to leak this heating season, it will make it easier to see.

Here's a picture for reference. Thanks in advance.


Long Island, NY

Comments

  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 20,490
    Personally I wouldn't bother, but... if the look of the rust is bothersome, there's no harm to painting it, but you are right in your thinking it will need a high temperature paint. Rutland and Rustoleum -- and maybe some others -- do make a high temperature paint which goes to 1200 F, which might be adequate. Rutland and Eastwood both make paints which are suitable for exhaust manifolds which are rated to 1400 F, and I'd be more inclined to look at one of those. VHT makes an even higher temperature paint -- again for automotive exhaust mainfolds (2000 F).

    Don't even think of using lower temperature paints made for barbecues and grilles and the like.

    If you do decide to paint, mask all the nuts and bolts and screws or anything else that might move.
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 13,901
    I'd also recommend the VHT paint.
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • FredoSP
    FredoSP Member Posts: 79
    Thank you for the comments.

    I was looking into this


    Long Island, NY
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 20,490
    That' it. Now just wire brush everything really clean, mask anything that might move and any threads, and have at it
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 13,901
    I think you need to cure VHT paint also, which in this case likely just means firing the boiler for a while. It'll probably smoke some.
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 18,254
    Or some stove polish. I use it on my cast iron wood stove.
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
    GGrossSTEVEusaPA
  • FredoSP
    FredoSP Member Posts: 79
    hot_rod said:

    Or some stove polish. I use it on my cast iron wood stove.

    Interesting, I never heard of that. Can you recommend a specific brand or type?
    Long Island, NY
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 20,490
    There are any number of good brands. Imperial makes a good one, but there are a lot of others. Check either Amazon or a good wood stove dealer... not as permanent as paint, but a whole lot easier to use (lean the surface, and apply and polish with a rag. May I recommend disposable gloves?)
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
    PC7060
  • FredoSP
    FredoSP Member Posts: 79
    edited August 2022
    Thank you all for the suggestions. I used Imperial Stove Polish Liquid. Here's the "After" pictures.

    Try not to look at that UGLY tankless coil that needs a new gasket, but you know how that goes ....








    Long Island, NY
    mattmia2PC7060