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Amtrol leaking from the top of the tank....not from a supply or return

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mocnnmaine
mocnnmaine Member Posts: 3
edited April 2022 in THE MAIN WALL
For starters I am definitely lacking the vocabulary that most of you seem to have, apologies. My Amtrol CH- 412, 41 gallon appears to be leaking from what I am going to call a seam. It almost looks like the top of the tank itself is threaded. That's probably my old man eyes. Anyway, I have my local plumbing and heating professional coming by tomorrow afternoon. In the mean time, can close the valves to the tank itself?
I'm leery because we have a forced hot water system and I'm assuming I won't be heating my house if close supply to the tank. I've turned the thermostat off on the tank and way down on the heat.







Comments

  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 23,536
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    It does look as though that might be coming from the end closure seam... if so, not so good.

    And no, if you valve off the tank you really can't run your heating system, since the water would try to expand and possibly pop something else...
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
    mocnnmaine
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 22,341
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    You may need a thermal expansion tanks also, have the plumber check for that.
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
    mocnnmaine
  • mocnnmaine
    mocnnmaine Member Posts: 3
    edited April 2022
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    I'm guessing from the sound of it, if it is the end closure seam...new tank.

    I have an expansion tank on the boiler, should I have one on the boiler and the tank? I'll ask. I appreciate both of you sharing your insight.
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 22,341
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    are you on a public water system, or your own well? If there is a check valve or backflow preventer on your water line, yes you need an expansion tank for the water heater. good idea to have one, as they may add backflow devices at he water line some day.

    A gasket leak like that could indicate a high pressure condition.
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
    mocnnmaine
  • mocnnmaine
    mocnnmaine Member Posts: 3
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    @hot_rod Thanks, that's a great tip. I am on city water. A few weeks ago the pressure release valve was open. I had just relit the pilot (don't know why that was out). I turned down the thermostat and the valve closed. I attributed the release valve to the fact that the temperature was too hot. Der...now it sounds like I may have a high pressure problem.
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 22,341
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    Get ya one of these, screw it right on the drain cock of the water heater, or any hose bib. See what the pressure is coming from the water system, then capture the high pressures from thermal expansion.

    Plumbing codes suggest 20- 80 psi pressure for domestic water.
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream