Welcome! Here are the website rules, as well as some tips for using this forum.
Need to contact us? Visit https://heatinghelp.com/contact-us/.
Click here to Find a Contractor in your area.

Getting radiators out of house....?

Options
Alan Muller
Alan Muller Member Posts: 31
Job is a 1920s house with frozen radiators. These are ordinary three-column rads assembled with left/right handed nipples. A few sections might be good but the great majority are cracked. I'm sure these were carried in as individual sections and assembled on the job. I'd like to disassemble or break up these to get them out safely but am not sure how to do it. Could cut them up with a Sawzall but it would tedious. Could the nipples be undone with something like a 1" impact wrench? Was wondering about splitting them apart with steel wedges used for splitting firewood. Suggestions welcome!

Comments

  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 23,525
    Options
    Easiest thing to do is going to be to strap them to an appliance type hand truck and trundle them out, into the pickup, and off to the scrap yard.
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
    Alan Muller
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 15,710
    edited March 2022
    Options
    @Alan Muller

    If you don't mind the dust a grinder with a cutting disk will go through it like butter. Buy some xtra disks Safety glasses and gloves are a must.

    Alan Muller
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 11,085
    Options
    How about a sledge hammer to crack them in the middle, they might pop apart.
    Half of a rad might be more manageable.
  • EricPeterson
    EricPeterson Member Posts: 215
    Options
    If they are assembled with threaded rod, remove the rods and then you should be able to separate the sections into more manageable pieces.
  • EdTheHeaterMan
    EdTheHeaterMan Member Posts: 8,153
    edited March 2022
    Options

    If they are assembled with threaded rod, remove the rods and then you should be able to separate the sections into more manageable pieces.

    Like this radiator


    But there are radiators with threaded nipples (left threads on one side, right threads on the other) and there is tool to tighten each section that fits in the opening at each section. It is a tedious process to put them together. Nearly impossible to take apart.

    No visible threaded rods on these radiators.

    Take them out in one piece or break them in half with a sledge hammer at a midpoint by smashing a section to pieces

    Edward Young Retired

    After you make that expensive repair and you still have the same problem, What will you check next?

  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 15,710
    Options
    Slice it with a grinder and a cutting disk. You don't have to cut all the way through it will break with a hammer after being weakened
    Alan Muller
  • Intplm.
    Intplm. Member Posts: 2,035
    Options
    This is a tough removal issue.
    What I have done is get as much help as possible, say four people. (I have done it alone, and I can't recommend that.)

    Get a few remnant carpets and flip them over so the carpet side is down. Tip the rads on their side onto the carpet or leave them on their legs. Once you have done that, it is easier to move the rads out. That is of course until you get to the staircase. Then it's time for your muscled helpers and a hand truck.

    There is no easy way really. It is always bull work. Using a carpet helps a lot.
    Breaking them up into more manageable pieces is a good idea but not easy.
  • Paul Pollets
    Paul Pollets Member Posts: 3,657
    Options
    I've found that if the radiator is too large to move, it can be disassembled after removing the threaded rods by using a larger hammer drill with a 1" chisel bit between the sections near the push nipples. The vibrations of the hammer drill work wonders.
  • FountainJim
    FountainJim Member Posts: 2
    Options
    I have been succesful in moving / removing radiators by threading pipe into the supply and return outlets and building handles out of threaded pipe. This allows for multiple helpers to get a strong and safe grip and it is much easier on the fingers and backs. Take a look at the following images.
    CLamb