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Koven water heater

TimK865
TimK865 Member Posts: 6
edited January 2022 in Domestic Hot Water
I currently have a Koven water heater and had seen some previous conversations on some of these older units. I am not sure of its date but amazed that it works so well when I moved in here. I'm sure it spins the electric meter but wondered if anyone has any input on these. Thanks 

Comments

  • Zman
    Zman Member Posts: 7,434
    Electric is electric, there really is no significant difference in efficiency.
    @Larry Weingarten can probably give some insight.
    "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough"
    Albert Einstein
  • Larry Weingarten
    Larry Weingarten Member Posts: 2,782
    Hi, I've only heard the name and seen other, similar units. If you could give us a close up of the name tag at the bottom, and another shot of the top of the tank, I might be of some use. Also, that pipe sticking out at the bottom left... Is that the drain valve? More fun could be had by sliding out the panel in front so we could see what type of elements and thermostats it has. (of course, turn off power first) Looking at it with an IR camera could be interesting too! :p

    Yours, Larry
    TimK865
  • kcopp
    kcopp Member Posts: 4,091
    Im wonderig if it is an early version of the Vaughn/ Sepco stonelined (portland cement) water heater
  • TimK865
    TimK865 Member Posts: 6
    Thanks for the input, and yes it is stone lined according to plate on other side.I will send pic of data plate tomorrow, thanks
  • Larry Weingarten
    Larry Weingarten Member Posts: 2,782
    edited January 2022
    Hi, Found this brochure: https://www.ebluejay.com/ads/item/5666672 It's a start. ;) So, based on what I see in the brochure, two questions come up. Does the tank have a relief valve? Does it have an anode that MIGHT need replacing? (Shouldn't, but trying to be thorough.) I'm impressed that it has 3" of insulation!

    Yours, Larry
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,179
    My back aches just looking at it.
    Retired and loving it.
  • TimK865
    TimK865 Member Posts: 6
    Thanks Larry for link thats neat. To clarify this unit works fine I was just curious on the year of this unit it amazes me how it has held up, they just don't make things to last like this anymore. I've added pic of data plate.
  • TimK865
    TimK865 Member Posts: 6
    Wonder how many of these are still in use?  Lol
  • Larry Weingarten
    Larry Weingarten Member Posts: 2,782
    Hi, It's just a guess, but the serial number starts with 1152, so it could have been made in November , 1952. No spring chicken! :p Still, having a relief valve isn't a bad idea. It became code across the US in the 1960s because heaters blowing up was a fairly common occurrence. Your heater would be roughly the equivalent of four sticks of dynamite.

    Yours, Larry
    TimK865kcopp
  • TimK865
    TimK865 Member Posts: 6
    Thanks Larry, not sure I like the sound of that lol. This could be pressure valve? I hope so and that it works. Guess I should update this unit for safety purposes. Works really well but don't need any loud surprises. 
  • TimK865
    TimK865 Member Posts: 6
    I have had this unit off before for couple days and water was still warm when turned back on, must be insulated pretty well. 
  • Larry Weingarten
    Larry Weingarten Member Posts: 2,782
    Hi, I’m not suggesting that you replace the heater.. keep it! I see a pressure relief at the bottom, but what’s needed is temperature relief as well. You could put a T right at the hot outlet so a T&P could be screwed in. That gets the probe into the tank. Then continue plumbing from the side outlet of the T to hot. This way you can have a safe and classic heater!

    Yours, Larry
    TimK865
  • kcopp
    kcopp Member Posts: 4,091
    I dont think you can get a t&p valve in that... they integrate a dip tube into the outlet.
    Code says it need to be in the top 6" of the tank.
    I would replace it.
    If that ever overheats it would be a mess.
    TimK865
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 13,883
    edited January 2022
    kcopp said:
    I dont think you can get a t&p valve in that... they integrate a dip tube into the outlet. Code says it need to be in the top 6" of the tank. I would replace it. If that ever overheats it would be a mess.
    It looks like the cold inlet is on the bottom

    Why would there be a dip tube?  And on the outlet?
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
    TimK865mattmia2
  • kcopp
    kcopp Member Posts: 4,091
    ChrisJ said:


    kcopp said:

    I dont think you can get a t&p valve in that... they integrate a dip tube into the outlet.
    Code says it need to be in the top 6" of the tank.
    I would replace it.
    If that ever overheats it would be a mess.

    It looks like the cold inlet is on the bottom

    Why would there be a dip tube?  And on the outlet?

    ...
    Dip tube is not the best term.... As they say in the literature a "heat trap" . Vaughn Sepco did/ does the same thing. they come out w a 90 off the top and run it down to a drop ear 90 for the outlet. the hot outlet does not go into the tank. A T&P would not fit.
    TimK865ChrisJ
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 13,883
    kcopp said:
    kcopp said:
    I dont think you can get a t&p valve in that... they integrate a dip tube into the outlet. Code says it need to be in the top 6" of the tank. I would replace it. If that ever overheats it would be a mess.
    It looks like the cold inlet is on the bottom

    Why would there be a dip tube?  And on the outlet?
    ... Dip tube is not the best term.... As they say in the literature a "heat trap" . Vaughn Sepco did/ does the same thing. they come out w a 90 off the top and run it down to a drop ear 90 for the outlet. the hot outlet does not go into the tank. A T&P would not fit.
    Ahhh I see.

    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 13,123
    looks like there may be a spot on top for a T & P relief valve. Could take the jacket off and take a look
    Larry WeingartenTimK865
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 7,165
    The phillips screws would be a bit unusual for the 50s.
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 13,883
    mattmia2 said:
    The phillips screws would be a bit unusual for the 50s.
    True yet very possible.
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
    TimK865
  • HVACNUT
    HVACNUT Member Posts: 4,860
    Change the hot out to a short brass nipple, brass Tee and and T&P 
    TimK865
  • Larry Weingarten
    Larry Weingarten Member Posts: 2,782
    Hi @TimK865 , I think I'd start by removing the top to verify/see if there is a heat trap. If so, and if it's threaded, adding a T at the top of the tank would give a good spot for the T&P. If you can take a picture with the top off, it would be useful to see!

    Yours, Larry