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Nash Jennings info

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Tom51
Tom51 Member Posts: 13
Wondering if anyone might have a service manual for this ?
Would love to make it work again.




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  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 15,543
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    The fellow on this forum you need is @Pumpguy

    Send him a PM
    Tom51
  • Pumpguy
    Pumpguy Member Posts: 659
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    This is a Nash Jennings Manifold Type Vacuum Heating Pump. It is a combination vacuum and condensate pump having 2 rotating elements; an air rotor #110, for air removal to produce the vacuum, and a centrifugal impeller #210 for pumping the condensate. Both pumping actions happen simultaneously.

    The attached sheets show a cross section of the pump, and the receiving tank.

    For more information feel free to give me a call. I'll do all I can to help you.
    Dennis Pataki. Former Service Manager and Heating Pump Product Manager for Nash Engineering Company. Phone: 1-888 853 9963
    Website: www.nashjenningspumps.com

    The first step in solving any problem is TO IDENTIFY THE PROBLEM.
    Tom51HVACNUT
  • Tom51
    Tom51 Member Posts: 13
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    Morning Dennis! Thank you for the response. It has been sometime since I stumbled on one of these. We MAY attempt to get it working again.
    Appreciate the cut sheets!
    tom
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 9,669
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    How old is this? The cut sheet is dated in the mid 70's but this looks like it is from the 30's.
  • Pumpguy
    Pumpguy Member Posts: 659
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    Tom51 said:

    Morning Dennis! Thank you for the response. It has been sometime since I stumbled on one of these. We MAY attempt to get it working again.
    Appreciate the cut sheets!
    tom

    Tom, If you could tell me what problems you are trying to resolve with this pump, I am sure I can advise you what's going on and how to proceed.

    Feel free to call me any time on my toll free number below. I will do all I can to help.
    Dennis Pataki. Former Service Manager and Heating Pump Product Manager for Nash Engineering Company. Phone: 1-888 853 9963
    Website: www.nashjenningspumps.com

    The first step in solving any problem is TO IDENTIFY THE PROBLEM.
    Tom51
  • Pumpguy
    Pumpguy Member Posts: 659
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    mattmia2 said:

    How old is this? The cut sheet is dated in the mid 70's but this looks like it is from the 30's.

    Pump first offered approximately 1917 in Piped Up version using threaded black pipe between riveted steel receiving tank, pump, and air separator.

    Manifold version released around 1925 using same pumps with cast iron receiving tank and cast iron manifolds between tank, pump, and separator.

    Both versions were in production through the mid 1950s. Right around 1950 Nash introduced their Type CSM vacuum condensate pump units which had separate pump and motor assemblies for vacuum and condensate pumping. A Full Duplex unit would have a total of 4 pump and motor assemblies; 2 pump and motor assemblies for pumping condensate, and 2 vacuum pumps for air removal.

    New Type CLS vacuum units are built using these same basic designs.
    Dennis Pataki. Former Service Manager and Heating Pump Product Manager for Nash Engineering Company. Phone: 1-888 853 9963
    Website: www.nashjenningspumps.com

    The first step in solving any problem is TO IDENTIFY THE PROBLEM.
    mattmia2Tom51
  • Pumpguy
    Pumpguy Member Posts: 659
    edited November 2021
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    Just FYI, these pumps were fitted with a wide variety of air rotors and condensate impellers inside the same housings, depending on the load it was sold to serve, and where the condensate is to be pumped to.

    If you're thinking about returning it to service, it would be best to survey the load (EDR) it will be applied to and compare that with the capacity of this particular pump.

    If you can provide me with your load calculations and the SIZE NUMBER of this pump, I should be able to tell you how closely this pump is sized to the load.

    The pump's SIZE NUMBER is found on the brass nameplate on top of the pump's body housing, just under the air manifold.
    Dennis Pataki. Former Service Manager and Heating Pump Product Manager for Nash Engineering Company. Phone: 1-888 853 9963
    Website: www.nashjenningspumps.com

    The first step in solving any problem is TO IDENTIFY THE PROBLEM.
    Tom51
  • jumper
    jumper Member Posts: 2,260
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    Is it wise to rehabilitate such old equipment? WW I technology?
    Can a modern properly engineered system perform better and require less electric consumption?
  • Pumpguy
    Pumpguy Member Posts: 659
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    jumper said:

    Is it wise to rehabilitate such old equipment? WW I technology?
    Can a modern properly engineered system perform better and require less electric consumption?

    Depends on what customer wants or has. Whenever customer has an old pump like this I always give them a choice. Some want new, and some want to stay with old tried and true technology. Others like the idea of installing modern pumps onto the old cast iron receiving tanks.

    Also, frequently old pumps like these are installed with piping arrangements that are not compatible with modern pumping equipment, so in addition to material and labor to remove old and install new pump, piping changes can be very extensive and in some cases virtually impossible.

    Power consumption is almost never considered. The one exception is when the pumps are to be upgraded to provide more air removal capacity (CFM) and there's not enough amperage available to power the larger pumps.

    One thing is for sure, new pumps are more efficient but far less rugged. They just don't build 'em like they used to.
    Dennis Pataki. Former Service Manager and Heating Pump Product Manager for Nash Engineering Company. Phone: 1-888 853 9963
    Website: www.nashjenningspumps.com

    The first step in solving any problem is TO IDENTIFY THE PROBLEM.
    Tom51
  • jumper
    jumper Member Posts: 2,260
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    >>Power consumption is almost never considered.<<

    My experience as well. I shouldn't be surprised by now.