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flushing out mud from steam boiler

tec
tec Member Posts: 3
edited December 2020 in THE MAIN WALL
I need to flush out the mud out of three boilers. There 's the boiler drain lower rear and a skimming tap with a valve upper front section of the boiler. Could I connect a garden hose to the skimming valve and open the boiler drain valve and flush it out that way and should I remove the low water cut-off probe and the pressuretrol

Comments

  • Steamhead
    Steamhead Member Posts: 16,823
    Make and model of your boilers?
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    Towson, MD, USA
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
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  • Big Ed_4
    Big Ed_4 Member Posts: 2,780
    Mud to remove would be the boiler drain not the skimmer port . Mud is an indication of steam leaks .
    I have enough experience to know , that I dont know it all
  • MaxMercy
    MaxMercy Member Posts: 508
    Off topic a bit but I have a question about "mud" in these steamers. I assume the mud is mostly the solids from added water staying behind when the steam evaporates, is that correct? If so, would not a good quality water filter be helpful on the water inlet side?
  • ethicalpaul
    ethicalpaul Member Posts: 5,701
    I wouldn't think so, unless as @Big Ed_4 said, there are steam leaks.

    In normal operation, only a tiny percentage of the boiler water is steam at any given time. But if you're putting lots of replacement water in, then yes, all that lost steam must leave behind its solids.
    NJ Steam Homeowner. See my sight glass boiler videos: https://bit.ly/3sZW1el
    MaxMercy
  • MaxMercy
    MaxMercy Member Posts: 508

    But if you're putting lots of replacement water in, then yes, all that lost steam must leave behind its solids.

    Which begs the question from someone who knows nothing about steam: how much replacement water would a steam system properly designed and operating (average 2000sq foot home for exaple) use per month during the winter?
  • AMservices
    AMservices Member Posts: 610
    I have seen a good amount of steam systems use no make-up water through a season. I have 1 system that sticks out in my mind that I replaced the boiler 3 years ago and the VXT auto feed clock still reads 000.
    I think everyone has there own methods on how to go about cleaning the inside of a boiler. 
    I kinda like what the OP is suggesting, connecting a hose to the skim port and flushing from the top down. That way your not pushing mud back in when refilling. 

    Every boiler I brake apart has a pile of mud opposite where the return connects. 
    There's been a number of times I've been flushing and flushing and the a chunk of mud breaks off and I'm back to square 1 . 
    Makes me sick working on a boiler for 5 hours and I feel like I need to be there for 5 more days. 
    MaxMercy
  • ethicalpaul
    ethicalpaul Member Posts: 5,701
    MaxMercy said:

    But if you're putting lots of replacement water in, then yes, all that lost steam must leave behind its solids.

    Which begs the question from someone who knows nothing about steam: how much replacement water would a steam system properly designed and operating (average 2000sq foot home for exaple) use per month during the winter?
    My small 1-pipe system (200 EDR) uses maybe a quart a month or a little more than that. It went to almost a quart a week when I had a slow drip on a radiator valve. It's that kind of change that you want to keep an eye on.
    NJ Steam Homeowner. See my sight glass boiler videos: https://bit.ly/3sZW1el
    MaxMercy