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Loose-Fill Insulation

brownstones11
brownstones11 Member, Email Confirmation Posts: 1
edited November 2020 in THE MAIN WALL
Does anyone know of a good-loose or blow-in insulation for the interior of an outside wall?

Comments

  • EdTheHeaterMan
    EdTheHeaterMan Member Posts: 2,416
    yes
    Edward Young
    Retired HVAC Contractor from So. Jersey Shore.
    Cleaned & services first oil heating system at age 16
    MaxMercy
  • kcopp
    kcopp Member Posts: 3,830
    Cellulose would work. It would be probably the most cost effective too.
  • psb75
    psb75 Member Posts: 482
    Dense-pack cellulose.
  • I've used dense pack fiberglass...I have concerns about the long term flammability of cellulose and the issues of smoldering.... See here for example.
    https://www.firefighternation.com/2011/11/28/fire-cellulose-insulation/#gref

    I've also been told directly by 3 generation firefighter families about this very problem.
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  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 17,165
    Loose fill blown in is also available in fiberglass -- which is at least itself non-combustible. I share @The Steam Whisperer 's concern about flammability, and add the remark that if one has older electrical wiring in the walls, one must be sure that it is protected with arc fault interrupting breakers of the correct rating (probably 15 amps) for the wire. This applies even with fiberglass, as you really don't want to risk the wire overheating -- and it wasn't intended to be surrounded by insulation.

    There are times when a drive for energy efficiency needs to be sanely balanced with a concern about safety...
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
  • PC7060
    PC7060 Member Posts: 508
    I’ve used BIB (blown in blanket) on a historic job where spray foam wasn’t allowed. Essentially pumping in the same fiberglass that’s used in attics to get a dense pack with nice R value and good draft stopping capability. 



    Not heavy so it doesn’t pump as well into closed walls.

    This same house had blown in rock wool insulation in some of the original sections. Think the works was from the 1980 and the installer did a nice job from the few sections I had to clean out as part of the additions I did. 
  • PC7060
    PC7060 Member Posts: 508
    edited November 2020
    We did the attic floor with same system and then put subfloor down over it. Put a second layer of 2x6 framing perpendicular to the original trusses to get 11” of dense pack fiberglass (approx. R45). 
     
    Sealed the 9” plenum duct and 2” lines for the Spacepak High Velocity system into chases and under floor so only the air handler and short section of plenum is in unconditioned space. 


  • psb75
    psb75 Member Posts: 482
    Cellulose treated with borates has a Class One Fire Rating. That is the principal reason for the borates. However, they also inhibit (if not prevent outright) RODENTS and insects. I have yet to see any major infestation of rodents in cellulose. While the bulk of my career has been spent observing, handling and removing rodent infested FIBERGLASS. Rodents...love...fiberglass. Why? They can "structure" it, i.e. tunnel and nest in it. They can't in cellulose, and the borates irritate them--a lot.
    Cellulose insulation is ground-up recycled newsprint. Borates are a derivative of borax and the element boron. Remember "20 Mule Team" laundry soap?
    GroundUpPC7060
  • If you get a chance read up on the meaning of Class One Fire rating....it does not mean that the material can't smolder. Read the link too.
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    ChrisJ
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 17,165

    If you get a chance read up on the meaning of Class One Fire rating....it does not mean that the material can't smolder. Read the link too.

    And please... go back and think about my comment on the electrical wiring.

    To which I will add. No buried junction boxes. No buried splices. No knob and tube or independent rubber/fabric insulated wires (they're OK inside metal armor or conduit, provided you have arc fault breakers). And my personal quirk: derate the wiring one rank if it's going to be surrounded by insulation. That is, 14 gauge is 10 amps, 12 gauge is 15 amps, 10 gauge is 20 amps. That's not explicitly in Code -- or it wasn't; it might be now) but is just prudent.
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
  • The Steam Whisperer
    The Steam Whisperer Member Posts: 760
    edited November 2020
    There are numerous articles about the issue of electric wiring overheating..... this applies to any added insulation that encapsulates old wiring. I am in Chicago and everything here was run in conduit in my 1903 home and I have pulled all new higher temp rated wire in the old conduit and the several hundred feet of new conduit. I have dense pack fiberglass walls and a mix of old rockwool, r-25 fiberglass batts and dense packed fiberglass in my ceilings.
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  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 17,165
    You're fine with the high temp wire.
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
  • I had all cloth covered wired, except in many junction boxes where the cloth had largely deteriorated and fell off... it was pretty scary.
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  • Solid_Fuel_Man
    Solid_Fuel_Man Member Posts: 2,307
    Old wireing is scary enough w/o insulation. 

    I wouldnt want or have any old wireing in my home. 


    Serving Northern Maine HVAC & Controls. I burn wood, it smells good!
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 9,001
    IIRC, K & T wiring could be fused at 20 amp for 14 AWG because of the theory of being in free air. Any insulation at all is forbidden to cover it.

    Actually most K & T wiring end up with 30 amp fuses or the "magic penny assistance".
    And yes fires, especially if insulated with anything.
    Being fewer surviving K&T systems, they either burned down or were rewired.

    Even early Romex cable brought into ceiling light J-boxes have cooked conductor insulation. Because of oversized bulbs installed and then attic insulation covering the box.
    Solid_Fuel_Man
  • Yep, I saw every kind of wiring I think there was ( short of in conduit, which I installed) in my old house...K &T, Cloth covered wire romex, rubber covered wire with cloth out shell romex and new romex. Romex..... not even as good as extension cord wire....
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