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EDR of straight pipe?

DsissonDsisson Member Posts: 55
I have "The Lost Art of Steam Heating". I remember reading in it *somewhere* that one can use uninsulated pipe as a sort of a radiator for small spaces. I also seem to recall that it had a table that listed the EDR of different pipe sizes per foot. But for the life of me I can't find it in the book and I even wonder if I was imagining it. Can anyone point me in the right direction for a table that lists the per foot EDR for black pipe?

Comments

  • Jamie HallJamie Hall Member Posts: 13,418
    Why bother with a table? A few seconds with your tape measure and a friendly calculator will give it to you. Measure the circumference of the pipe in inches. Multiply that by 12 (the number of inches in a foot) and divide by 144 (square inches per square foot) and there you are. The EDR of a foot of your pipe.
    Br. Jamie, osb

    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England.

    Hoffman Equipped System (all original except boiler), Weil-Mclain 580, 2.75 gph Carlin, Vapourstat 0.5 -- 6.0 ounces per square inch
  • DsissonDsisson Member Posts: 55
    edited October 12
    Thank you - as I understand it:

    EDR of steel sched. 40 pipe (example)

    pipe size = 1"

    diameter = 1.315"

    EDR per foot = 0.344

    correct?
  • EBEBRATT-EdEBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 7,316
    yes. 3,14 (pie) x 1.315 (diameter) = 4.129 x 12"=49.5492

    49.5492/144=.344
    mattmia2
  • ted_pted_p Member Posts: 63
    edited October 13
    Here's one:



    And Here's the link:
    Carbon Steel, ANSI Schedule 40 (in) Datasheet

    Use the numbers in the "External Surface Area" column.
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