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Anode Rods

Steve_210
Steve_210 Member Posts: 591
I am sure we spoke about this before, but to all the heating contractors out there
How do you approach changing the anode rods on the indirect storage tanks? One particular manufacturer does not have one at all. I've changed (2) indirects in the last 2 weeks less than 10 years old. Obviously the anode rods were not changed. I am being told about every 3 years for NYC water. Just looking for some opinions.

Comments

  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 14,552
    Not many of the stainless indirects have anode rods. i think HeatFlo adds them now.

    If it is an enameled steel tank, they should defiantly be monitored and changer to get the best life out of the tank.

    i suspect a small % of tanks have anode rod service performed.
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
  • Larry Weingarten
    Larry Weingarten Member Posts: 2,082
    Hi @Steve_210 , I've changed anodes in thousands of tanks. My approach is to check the anode when it's on or two years old and from the remaining sacrificial metal on the rod, determine how often the rod should be changed. In over-softened water, that can be every six months. In clean water with two anodes in the tank, it can be six years before the anodes need to be replaced.

    Yours, Larry

    ps, Bob is right. Very few tanks ever have their anodes checked. Few plumbers have the right tools for it.
  • BDR529
    BDR529 Member Posts: 170
    Heat-flow tanks are stainless steel with the largest anode I've seen in a 40 gallon tank. You could mug someone with that anode.

    Remove more bad HTP tanks than install new. No anode.

    In town water around 5 years but a well.. Like Larry says 6 months is about it. All wells seem to be over softened lately.

    "Few plumbers have the right tools for it." They don't have a socket and breaker bar? Bah-Ha-Ha!!
  • kcopp
    kcopp Member Posts: 3,657
    Weil Mclain used to have one in their SS tanks. For some reason they stopped...it was 1 3/4" thick.
    A good option would be to add an electrified version then you don't have to worry about them for a good while. As an added benefit they typically will not have an issue w/ the smells that can happen w/ certain well water.
  • Steve_210
    Steve_210 Member Posts: 591
    Thanks guys forgot to mention on the tanks I changed in the last couple of weeks it was a leaking coil not the tank
    Two different manufacturers
  • Steve_210
    Steve_210 Member Posts: 591
    I think a lot of guys are afraid of doing damage taking out the anode rod I tried taking them out on some old water heaters and they are very tight you definitely don’t want to crack the tank
  • Larry Weingarten
    Larry Weingarten Member Posts: 2,082
    Hi, I mentioned above that I'd replaced anodes in thousands of heaters. I've never "cracked" or damaged one. I use a tool called a torque multiplier. It has a 1/2" input and 3/4" output. It triples your strength and uses another point on top of the tank to lever from, so turning the whole tank while wrenching on it doesn't happen. It's small enough to fit into tight spots too. This tool makes what can be a difficult job pretty easy.

    Yous, Larry
    mattmia2SuperTechCLambrick in Alaska
  • ratio
    ratio Member Posts: 2,726
    I hear the big ½" cordless impacts will take an anode out with authority as well, although I suppose they wouldn't fit in everywhere @Larry Weingarten's torque multiplier would.

    One of these days I'll have an excuse to get one & I'll try it.

  • Larry Weingarten
    Larry Weingarten Member Posts: 2,082
    Hi @ratio , I've heard those can work nicely. Only thing is that I've snapped off 1/2" drives trying to get anodes out, before getting the torque multiplier. So a cordless impact with a bigger drive would be nice. Some commercial heaters have 1" anodes, which REALLY need all the torque the torque multiplier gives. :#

    Yours, Larry
  • STEVEusaPA
    STEVEusaPA Member Posts: 4,810
    If only there was a book, just about water heaters...
    http://www.heatinghelp.com/store/detail/the-water-heater-workbook-a-hands-on-guide-to-water-heaters
    Actually just used mine a few weeks ago to check out elements on an electric water heater.
    steve
  • BDR529
    BDR529 Member Posts: 170
    Tourque Mulitiplier! on a anode! If the rod is in the top of the tank how to you keep the tank from turning with the wrench?
  • Larry Weingarten
    Larry Weingarten Member Posts: 2,082
    Hi, The tool has a “foot” that rests against a pipe or other fitting on top of the tank. Leverage is exerted between that pipe and the head of the anode, so very little force is trying to rotate the tank. Hope that makes sense. B)
    Yours, Larry
  • SuperTech
    SuperTech Member Posts: 1,574
    I've never tried the torque multiplier, looks like another great tool to have.  
    I had a Bock 32E last year that resisted every effort that I threw at it. Even a pneumatic impact driver wouldn't budge the damn anode rod. I never struggled so much with one, usually a breaker bar is enough to get the job done.
  • STEVEusaPA
    STEVEusaPA Member Posts: 4,810
    edited August 2020
    You don’t change the anode rod on a 32E, you replace the whole unit...lol
    I do want that tool too.
    @Larry Weingarten do you have a source for that tool or is something you bought/modified?
    Edit: I looked it up in your book-Sweeney #290 by Sargent Industries.
    steve
    SuperTech
  • Larry Weingarten
    Larry Weingarten Member Posts: 2,082
    Hi @STEVEusaPA , I modify that tool a bit by adding the foot, which is made from two ball joint rod ends, 5/8”, male and female, from McMaster Carr. That allows it to work off a pipe nipple or fitting on top of the tank. Thanks for reading the book!

    Yours, Larry
    STEVEusaPA
  • Can you video a demonstration for us, Larry?

    I’m in my 3rd week of sciatica bed rest and have all the doors and windows closed to prevent smoke from getting in the house, so I have lots of time to study videos. :smile:
    Often wrong, never in doubt.
  • Larry Weingarten
    Larry Weingarten Member Posts: 2,082
    edited August 2020
    Hmmm @Alan (California Radiant) Forbes , I’ll see about figuring out how to do that! Right now I’m evacuated along with getting to breathe smoke. You get better. I’ll hope to have a house and we can go from there🙏

    Yours, Larry
  • Your house must be inland a bit. Hope you have a comfortable place to layover. We’ll be thing of you. 
    Often wrong, never in doubt.
  • Larry Weingarten
    Larry Weingarten Member Posts: 2,082
    Yup, It’s threatened by the River fire, near Salinas. I’m doing okay, thanks 😊
  • Larry Weingarten
    Larry Weingarten Member Posts: 2,082
    Some good news. They just lifted the evacuation order! 🤪
    Alan (California Radiant) Forbesrick in AlaskaSuperTech
  • Tim_D
    Tim_D Member Posts: 36
    Weil-McLain removed the anode rod from their indirect tanks because they instituted a new process. All tanks are double welded, inside and outside welds. The tanks are than pickled and passivated to ensure that the welds and tanks are clean and free of contaminants which are the major cause of failures.
    mattmia2
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