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Can I get an review of my install pls

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  • kensheets2
    kensheets2 Member Posts: 36
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    GW
    The parts u pictured were the ones that I was going to use. I do like the idea of a bit of extra control with the supply side valve though.
  • Alan (California Radiant) Forbes
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    We always valve both sides.......and never showing any PEX.

    This was for a job with radiators with bottom connections where there was a basement below where we transitioned to PEX.



    8.33 lbs./gal. x 60 min./hr. x 20°ΔT = 10,000 BTU's/hour

    Two btu per sq ft for degree difference for a slab
    mattmia2
  • GW
    GW Member Posts: 4,693
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    Alan, just curious, what is the practical reason for two valves? You would still need to drain the rad the old fashioned way of there was a service incident. At that point it takes 3 minutes to screw on a cap (on the return side) if you needed to refill the system to heat the rest of the home.

    I’m all good for service valves, I spend dough at the boiler area for sure
    Gary Wilson
    Wilson Services, Inc
    Northampton, MA
    gary@wilsonph.com
  • GW
    GW Member Posts: 4,693
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    > @kensheets2 said:
    > GW
    > The parts u pictured were the ones that I was going to use. I do like the idea of a bit of extra control with the supply side valve though.

    Yes isn’t that what my pic shows? Maybe I didn’t pay attention to the arrows 😀
    Gary Wilson
    Wilson Services, Inc
    Northampton, MA
    gary@wilsonph.com
  • Alan (California Radiant) Forbes
    Alan (California Radiant) Forbes Member Posts: 4,004
    edited April 2020
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    GW said:

    Alan, just curious, what is the practical reason for two valves? You would still need to drain the rad the old fashioned way of there was a service incident. At that point it takes 3 minutes to screw on a cap (on the return side) if you needed to refill the system to heat the rest of the home.

    There are too many advantages to valve both sides. The main one being that you won't need to go into the mechanical room at all to service a radiator to drop the pressure or to refill.
    Also, if all you have is a union connection, you'll need more than a cap, no?
    8.33 lbs./gal. x 60 min./hr. x 20°ΔT = 10,000 BTU's/hour

    Two btu per sq ft for degree difference for a slab
  • GW
    GW Member Posts: 4,693
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    You’re right- I just have never said to myself gee wiz I shoulda installed a valve on each side. Maybe that day will come

    Spin on a cap: well 30 seconds to spin off the female fitting body and another two minutes to tape up and spin on a cap- but I must have good luck I guess- never have done that either.

    Ancient hot water systems, no valves (or, I’m certainly not going to actually shut off an ancient valve)

    Most of our modern installs are home run so it’s easy to deal with

    My service guy has has to change a panel rad valve a few times- maybe he would say differently
    Gary Wilson
    Wilson Services, Inc
    Northampton, MA
    gary@wilsonph.com
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 9,661
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    @Alan (California Radiant) Forbes , isn't there a fitting that screws on where that cap is that lets you attach a hose and drain the radiator through the valve?
  • kensheets2
    kensheets2 Member Posts: 36
    edited April 2020
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    EBEBRATT-Ed, mentioned reducing to 1/2" off of the main 3/4" supply and return to each of the radiators, is there any downfall to that versus staying with 3/4" to the radiator valving. That would make life so much more bearable.
  • Alan (California Radiant) Forbes
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    mattmia2 said:

    @Alan (California Radiant) Forbes , isn't there a fitting that screws on where that cap is that lets you attach a hose and drain the radiator through the valve?

    Maybe, but how would you open the valve once the hose is screwed on. The valve is under the cap.

    I believe they are Oventrop or Danfoss lockshield valves.
    8.33 lbs./gal. x 60 min./hr. x 20°ΔT = 10,000 BTU's/hour

    Two btu per sq ft for degree difference for a slab
  • GW
    GW Member Posts: 4,693
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    EBEBRATT-Ed, mentioned reducing to 1/2" off of the main 3/4" supply and return to each of the radiators, is there any downfall to that versus staying with 3/4" to the radiator valving. That would make life so much more bearable.

    No, the flow through a rad is somewhat small, you can do 3/4 if you really want but it's more normal to do 1/2.
    Gary Wilson
    Wilson Services, Inc
    Northampton, MA
    gary@wilsonph.com
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 22,157
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    1/2" should be able to move 15,000 BTU/hr, no harm in going to 3/4, valves are probably the same cost.
    I too would transition to copper under the floor, I don't like to see exposed pex at radiators, like Alan showed.
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
  • Alan (California Radiant) Forbes
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    Looks cool and yes, it would serve a purpose if for whatever reason you felt as though you needed to drain your radiator on a regular basis. But it's few and far between the number of times I've had to drain a radiator to service it; mostly to replace the manual air vent and I sometimes do that on the fly if there aren't any isolation valves.
    8.33 lbs./gal. x 60 min./hr. x 20°ΔT = 10,000 BTU's/hour

    Two btu per sq ft for degree difference for a slab
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 9,661
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    I think that fitting screws on to the valves you are using (or something very similar) to allow you to drain the radiator in a controlled manner if you need to remove it. Not quire clear to me how it allows you to turn the valve off without water pouring out but also allows it to drain in to that fitting but I know I saw a description of the system somewhere.
  • GW
    GW Member Posts: 4,693
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    It’s all very nice but what is one to do, run a hose through the house?

    We just kill the two valves at the manifold, take the pressure off (or skip that part of it a smaller rad or we are in a flaming hurry), gently snip the Pex and let the pressure bleed into a bucket (bucket up at the ceiling), snip it, then snip the other like a foot or whatever away as to not cross the likes when we re couple the lines.
    Gary Wilson
    Wilson Services, Inc
    Northampton, MA
    gary@wilsonph.com
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 9,661
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    Or a shallow bucket...
  • GW
    GW Member Posts: 4,693
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    Try it and let me know how it works 😀
    Gary Wilson
    Wilson Services, Inc
    Northampton, MA
    gary@wilsonph.com