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United States Radiator Corporation in Dunkirk, NY

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Kybeans403
Kybeans403 Member Posts: 56
Love these old tanks, the crazy looks I get when I carry them downstairs and explain there usefulness, many many years ago. Haven't found one is this good shape in a long time.

EdTheHeaterManegansenSTEVEusaPAmattmia2

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  • Big Ed_4
    Big Ed_4 Member Posts: 2,806
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    I wonder why there are no more copper tanks :wink:

    There was an error rendering this rich post.

    SuperTech
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,545
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    That makes me smile. Thanks for sharing.
    Retired and loving it.
    EdTheHeaterMan
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 15,620
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    Rivited construction probably dates to the 20s or before. Welding came on steam around 1915 but it took some time before it was commonly used.

    Did it have a date stamped on it??
  • mikeg2015
    mikeg2015 Member Posts: 1,194
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    IS that an atmospheric expansion tank in and attic for a gravity hot water system?
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 11,075
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    That would be my guess also. Sometimes they were installed on the highest floor up high on the wall to avoid freezing in the attic.
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,545
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    @mikeg2015 yes it is.
    Retired and loving it.
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 9,747
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    was the bottom half drawn in a press then the top just riveted on?
  • mikeg2015
    mikeg2015 Member Posts: 1,194
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    mattmia2 said:

    was the bottom half drawn in a press then the top just riveted on?

    I’m going to guess it’s crimped and then possibly lead soldered in some manner. Top is assembled later after the various taps are added, which appear to be threaded bulk-head type fittings, so there’t a nut on the back side and a gasket.

    Top gets riveted and probably has a gasket of some sort. Looks like it gets galvanized afterwards.

    Just a WAG on this.
  • Larry Weingarten
    Larry Weingarten Member Posts: 3,335
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    Hi, Looking closely at the bottom edge, I see it's uneven, like it was welded. So my guess is that the bottom head was drawn and pressed into place, then welded.

    Yours, Larry
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 9,747
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    If it is seamed I just wonder why they would do the bottom one way and the top another.
  • Larry Weingarten
    Larry Weingarten Member Posts: 3,335
    edited March 2020
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    Hi, It's completely a guess, but I imagine it would be easier to do a good hot dipped coating with the top off. The edges of the top and rivets suggest it was installed/assembled after being hot dipped. B)

    Yours, Larry
    mattmia2
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 22,256
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    It would make a nice solar drawback tank, top and bottom connections, sight glass.
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
    kcopp
  • Kybeans403
    Kybeans403 Member Posts: 56
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    Rivets on bottom! After I went back the next day, I actually brought a little hand pump and small bucket of water and tested the relief/overflow channel.......it was a copper channel, which ran under the cedar shakes, roughly 10 feet to gutters....and it didn't leak a single drop!

    I cannot find a date, BUT my customer who lives there is in here late 70's and her parents originally owned the house so early 1900's is accurate.