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Tiger Loop

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Comments

  • weedhopper
    weedhopper Member Posts: 59
    I was agreeing with HVACNUT. Anything mechanical can get messed up over time and if the valve stuck closed I may not get oil flow.

    If the check valve quit and the oil expanded it would go into my new Tiger Loop, correct?
  • STEVEusaPA
    STEVEusaPA Member Posts: 5,463
    If the check valve 'quit', meaning wouldn't open, oil goes no where.
    steve
  • weedhopper
    weedhopper Member Posts: 59


    That’s what I wrote a couple of posts above. Looks like a pretty easy removal for the heating guy this summer. One less thing to go wrong.

    In my own business I use the KISS, keep it simple, stupid approach and it works... I guess 🤓
    BillyO
  • Big Ed_4
    Big Ed_4 Member Posts: 1,829
    edited March 2020
    The problem with over head lines is trapped air will cause safety problems if not fully eliminated .. The check valve was added to correct this problem which we know does not work and justs adds restriction . (They are only used for direction of oil on some systems like a diode)..If all the air is removed the pressures though out the system will equalize . The drop of the oil is equal to the rise of the oil . To achieve this all the air has to be removed from the overhead oil line .. Bleeding at he pump will not remove all the air .. A high volume pump is needed to bleed the trapped air out of the system . A push pull pump will work if you are willing to use one . Self priming would work too ...
    I have enough experience to know , that I dont know it all
  • STEVEusaPA
    STEVEusaPA Member Posts: 5,463
    edited March 2020
    Big Ed_4 said:

    ...all the air has to be removed from the overhead oil line .. Bleeding at he pump will not remove all the air .. A high volume pump is needed to bleed the trapped air out of the system ...

    Not entirely true. A Power Vacuum Bleed will work too-no push/pull pump needed.
    https://fueloilnews.com/2016/05/26/a-few-tricks/
    steve
    SuperTechrick in Alaska
  • weedhopper
    weedhopper Member Posts: 59
    I could have the line dropped to the floor but there is an8’ opening from my office to the back of the basement. I could find a Rubbermaid commercial type threshold to protect it I guess.

    The former line was buried in the concrete and nobody liked that idea.
    HVACNUT
  • HVACNUT
    HVACNUT Member Posts: 4,363
    I would definitely run the line on the ground and through a makeshift saddle past the doorway.
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 11,196
    I would run it on the floor is at all possible. Just less problems. You could run it under the concrete sleeve it through pvc conduit or on to of the floor in a steel pipe or conduit.

    Coated oil line in the concrete is not an issue
  • rick in Alaska
    rick in Alaska Member Posts: 1,294
    Personally, I would not want to have to deal with running it across the floor. I would leave it where it is, powerbleed it, and put on a Tigerloop if it still gives you fits.
    Rick
  • Big Ed_4
    Big Ed_4 Member Posts: 1,829
    What is a vacuum Bleed ?
    I have enough experience to know , that I dont know it all
  • STEVEusaPA
    STEVEusaPA Member Posts: 5,463
    Click on the link in my last post
    steve
  • Big Ed_4
    Big Ed_4 Member Posts: 1,829
    Help me on this . The idea is to build up maximum volume of vacuum in the fuel pump to to bleed and remove trapped air ?
    I have enough experience to know , that I dont know it all
  • OuterCapeOilguy
    OuterCapeOilguy Member Posts: 27
    edited December 2020
    Deaerators (Tiger Loop™, Mitco Smart-Flo™, etc.) are meant to address specific issues. They're great for dealing with cold oil problems caused by outdoor tanks, for one thing. Also, single-pipe systems are known for combustion issues when air bubbles make it through the pump into the nozzle line, causing after-drip and the smoke/soot which results. Air bubbles-such as might be picked up if the burner is running during a fuel delivery, or if the burner is located above the tank (or fuel is being picked up from the tank to an overhead oil line) can cause flame outages resulting in a lockout. They are also a great alternative to traditional two-pipe systems, eliminating the long return line to the tank with its potential for leaks, and eliminating the high flow rate through the filter. They are also-as the following points out-useful diagnostic tools for disclosing the presence of leaks.

    They were NEVER meant to be a "band-aid" for poor piping practices, damaged/broken/leaky fittings or flare joints, or leaking lines. They are also not meant to be used in place of a 2-stage pump in situations where a single-stage pump is inadequate. If a line is routinely getting air-bound, there's a leak-FIX IT! I just finished a job in which the burner-fitted with a Tiger Loop™, began losing its prime and locking out. Upon investigation (part of which involved watching the Tiger Loop and noticing foam and bubbles which had not previously been present), I discovered that the flare nut holding the dip tube to its tank adaptor fitting was cracked all the way through! There's only one fix for that-replace the damn flare nut.

    **Also-lose that check valve! There is no need for it, and it will create far more problems than it could ever solve.

  • weedhopper
    weedhopper Member Posts: 59
    edited December 2020
    I never installed the Tiger Loop on the old boiler as it (24 years) started leaking and the heat would not shut off. So last month we had the boiler replaced and installed the Tiger Loop. The oil line is still overhead and everything works like a charm.

    I think the boiler was causing the lockouts , there was soot in the pipes when they drained the system and the hot water coil was bathed in sooty water. The guys think maybe water dripping into the burner was killing the flame on start up. Just a guess , we did not dwell on it. There was muddy soot inside the hot water coil area when I pulled the coil. Next spring we will lift the corpse out thru the hatchway and I will do a quick autopsy on the back of the Tundra before I take it to the dump.