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Water pooling on floor next to AC return

Newer heat pump. I am having large amounts of water on the carpet--has to be absorbed with multiple bath towels. Return is in wall-- there is no water standing in return. Return is directly below air handler--no water anywhere near air handler. Its like someone is just pouring water on carpet approximately 6" away from return vent. Any idea what could be causing this?

Comments

  • HVACNUTHVACNUT Member Posts: 3,057
    There's no condensate in the air handler in heat pump mode.
    Any plumbing in the wall or above? Humidifier? Bathroom?
  • Jamie HallJamie Hall Member Posts: 12,334
    Verify where the water is coming from. Try putting a towel in the return itself. If it gets wet... if not, it's not coming down the return.
    Br. Jamie, osb

    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England.

    Hoffman Equipped System (all original except boiler), Weil-Mclain 580, 2.75 gph Carlin, Vapourstat 0.5 -- 6.0 ounces per square inch
  • ChrisJChrisJ Member Posts: 10,667
    How do these defrost?
    Do they reverse?
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • HVACNUTHVACNUT Member Posts: 3,057
    Dumb question, but it's not a geo HP right?
  • Donles316Donles316 Member Posts: 5
    No plumbing nearby. No vent nearby. No moisture immediately adjacent to the wall....its about 6" away but will not saturate if unit is not running. It's an Amana model ASPT47D14AA
  • ChrisJChrisJ Member Posts: 10,667
    Donles316 said:

    No plumbing nearby. No vent nearby. No moisture immediately adjacent to the wall....its about 6" away but will not saturate if unit is not running. It's an Amana model ASPT47D14AA

    Are you 100% sure water isn't leaking from the roof, outside wall etc?
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • Donles316Donles316 Member Posts: 5
    Yes, its frustrating because the water is only collecting about 6" away from the wall where the return is located. I just pulled the front off. Not much water in the pan but it feels almost like half set gelatin at the bottom of pan and in the drain tube. Coils are spotless. The float wont trip the unit, either.
  • Jolly BodgerJolly Bodger Member Posts: 209
    Air source heat pump will reverse to defrost. This will condensate on the EVAP coil. Drain could be plugged, pan cracked, out of level, or windage is blowing it off the coil.
  • Donles316Donles316 Member Posts: 5
    Going to clean the drain and pan to be safe but there is literally no moisture or even dampness anywhere adjacent to the handler, drain tubes, etc. Just the carpet 6" away from the return.
  • ChrisJChrisJ Member Posts: 10,667

    Air source heat pump will reverse to defrost. This will condensate on the EVAP coil. Drain could be plugged, pan cracked, out of level, or windage is blowing it off the coil.

    Can the lineset sweat on these where it wouldn't normally during cooling? If the liquid line isn't insulated etc?
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • mattmia2mattmia2 Member Posts: 1,031
    It sounds like the "half set gelatin" which is probably some combination of bacteria and mold, is plugging up the drain.
  • HVACNUTHVACNUT Member Posts: 3,057
    High water table?
    Have you lifted the carpet to see if it originated there or is just pooling there from another area?
  • motoguy128motoguy128 Member Posts: 48
    I’d expect dry coil in winter indoor humidity levels. Certainly not enough to make the floor wet.
  • Jolly BodgerJolly Bodger Member Posts: 209
    @ChrisJ the liquid (3/8" line) does not sweat. Or I should say should not and I have not seen one do it.

    My HP makes water in defrost.

    @Donles316 are you sure the HP is working correctly and not stuck in defrost with the backup heat running? This is the equivalent of running the heat and AC at the same time. Basically making an industrial dehumidifier.
  • Donles316Donles316 Member Posts: 5
    @Jolly Bodger
    How would I check that? I'm not well versed in HVAC but I can follow directions with the best of them. It's just odd since there is no moisture im the air return or anywhere around the air handler, just in the middle of the hallway about 6" from the return vent. There is no plumbing below this area, nor any vents above.
  • ChrisJChrisJ Member Posts: 10,667
    Donles316 said:

    @Jolly Bodger

    How would I check that? I'm not well versed in HVAC but I can follow directions with the best of them. It's just odd since there is no moisture im the air return or anywhere around the air handler, just in the middle of the hallway about 6" from the return vent. There is no plumbing below this area, nor any vents above.

    I think the deal is pretty much the water is coming from somewhere and someone there needs to figure out where.

    We can't see it. If the evaporator is dry then it's not coming from that. But if it's wet and the drain for it is leaking and running down a stud or something, who knows.

    I had a 4" vent leak on the roof and run down and some how end up leaking out of the door casing over the back door no where near the pipe. In fact, it was making a 90 degree turn somehow because it wasn't even in that wall.

    Water can do really bizarre things. The room it happened in is gutted right now so I can see all of the framing and I still can't figure out how it was doing it.
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • mattmia2mattmia2 Member Posts: 1,031
    I have seen the liquid line sweat and even ice when there were eveperator airflow issues.
  • ChrisJChrisJ Member Posts: 10,667
    mattmia2 said:

    I have seen the liquid line sweat and even ice when there were eveperator airflow issues.

    How would airflow issues cause the liquid line to sweat?
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • Jolly BodgerJolly Bodger Member Posts: 209
    OK, I think I have seen that once when the entire condenser was a snowman.
  • ChrisJChrisJ Member Posts: 10,667

    OK, I think I have seen that once when the entire condenser was a snowman.

    Sounds like a little more than an "airflow issue" at that point even if it started out as one.
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • Patchogue Phil_2Patchogue Phil_2 Member Posts: 303
    > @Donles316 said:
    > Newer heat pump. I am having large amounts of water on the carpet--has to be absorbed with multiple bath towels. Return is in wall-- there is no water standing in return. Return is directly below air handler--no water anywhere near air handler. Its like someone is just pouring water on carpet approximately 6" away from return vent. Any idea what could be causing this?

    So, did you find out the water source?
  • unclejohnunclejohn Member Posts: 1,494
    The unit is running in the heating mode right. Can you seen a picture of the unit and where the water is.
  • SteamingatMohawkSteamingatMohawk Member Posts: 226
    Is there a small pump and reservoir about the size of half a loaf of bread that pushes the condensate out of the house? If so, check the piping to it, the pump itself, the reservoir and the piping going out of the house. Don't just look at it, blow air through the pipes to make sure they are clear.

    After 30 years in upstate New York, I had water on the floor at my house. I ended up drilling two holes in the condensate line to the pump so it can be inspected and cleaned. Then I taped the hole shut...too lazy to replace the PVC fittings. Maybe some day.

    Pics attached.

  • mattmia2mattmia2 Member Posts: 1,031
    just cut it and slip a piece of vinyl tubing and hose clamps over it
  • SteamingatMohawkSteamingatMohawk Member Posts: 226
    Good idea. It will look better than two black X's on the white PVC. I put the holes half way up the side to try to make sure any condensate wouldn't leak out. So far, so good.
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