Welcome! Here are the website rules, as well as some tips for using this forum.
Need to contact us? Visit https://heatinghelp.com/contact-us/.
Click here to Find a Contractor in your area.

2 pipe steam system one radiator not getting hot.. have pic of valve. anyone know how to fix?

Options
Joseph_4
Joseph_4 Member Posts: 274
Hi. I have a customer with 2 pipe steam and one radiator gets hot until a point. Could something be clogged in the pictured valve.. anyone know how to fix it?
Thx
Joe
HHI Services



Comments

  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,544
    Options
    I believe that’s a variable-orifice valve and probably set to allow in less steam than the radiator is able to condense. Do you have a pic looking down at the valve.
    Retired and loving it.
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 23,433
    Options
    To which I would add -- the question isn't does the radiator get hot, but is the space it serves comfortable? If the space it serves is comfortable, then -- since I agree it looks like a variable orifice valve -- it may have been set that way quite deliberately, for balance.
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
  • Joseph_4
    Joseph_4 Member Posts: 274
    Options
    The Radiator itself does NOT get hot but the first couple of feet of supply pipe in basement do. The heat doesnt reach to the valve. Sorry I wasn't clear with My info.. I will get a picture looking from top down.
    Thx
    Joe
  • nicholas bonham-carter
    Options
    You could test the valve by loosening the Union nut, while the boiler is off, then turning it on, to see if steam is getting through the valve. Retighten the Union nut.
    If steam appears after the valve, then make the same test with the trap bonnet removed, to see if steam gets that far.
    A helper with hand on the boiler switch is very helpful, as steam can cause deep burns!-NBC
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 23,433
    Options
    Carefully check that supply pipe in the basement. Usually (not always!) if a valve is closed the pipe will get hot up to the valve, or very close to it. If, on the other hand, the pipe pitch isn't correct, or there is a sag in the pipe, it is quite possible for condensate to collect in the pipe and block the flow of steam quite effectively.
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England