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Minisplit condenser pad and cinder blocks

Mounting the outdoor condenser for minisplit on a pre-made polypropylene pad. Also want the unit up higher (not wall mounting). If I use cinderblocks, which goes down first? Blocks then pad then condenser? Or pad then blocks then condenser?

Comments

  • Intplm.Intplm. Posts: 761Member
    It really shouldn't matter. The best thing to do is follow the manufacturers recommendation, for height and clearances around the unit. As Well as securing the unit so it is fastened properly.
    The polypropylene pad can be great for leveling the unit, but some pads can be very slippery. They don't have a lot of grip.
    So if its a soft pad you should be fine using it at the base. If it's a hard poly pad, I would not use it either way.
    So. If not, no poly base at all is what I would do. Than I would secure the blocks so they make a firm foundation, then secure the unit to the block.
  • Steve MinnichSteve Minnich Posts: 2,462Member
    edited June 11
    There are small structural steel brackets made specifically for minisplits. Mount the condensing unit to that and then set it on, ideally, a concrete pad.
    Steve Minnich
    Tell me I can't, and I'll show you I can.
  • Patchogue Phil_2Patchogue Phil_2 Posts: 296Member
    I have seen the wall mount brackets, but not the type you describe. How tall are they? My goal is to keep the unit up higher than leaves and snow. Long Island NY location.
  • Steve MinnichSteve Minnich Posts: 2,462Member

    Look into Diversitech's website. Those are the ones I used. Hope this helps.
    Steve Minnich
    Tell me I can't, and I'll show you I can.
  • JUGHNEJUGHNE Posts: 5,727Member
    I use only 1 cinder block under each foot, the blocks are on concrete pad. I believe the defrost melt water should fall below the unit to the pad.
    IMO, a solid pad directly under the unit will allow the melt water to refreeze and eventually damage the bottom of the unit.
  • Patchogue Phil_2Patchogue Phil_2 Posts: 296Member
    > @JUGHNE said:
    > I use only 1 cinder block under each foot, the blocks are on concrete pad. I believe the defrost melt water should fall below the unit to the pad.
    > IMO, a solid pad directly under the unit will allow the melt water to refreeze and eventually damage the bottom of the unit.


    Good point.
  • Jamie HallJamie Hall Posts: 10,548Member
    And Furthermore...if you are in an area where the ground freezes, you must be sure that whatever the thing sits on moves as a unit when the ground freezes. Which means good solid pad -- not four cinder blocks in the corners. You can put something on the pad, though to raise it higher.
    Jamie



    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England.



    Hoffman Equipped System (all original except boiler), Weil-Mclain 580, 2.75 gph Carlin, Vapourstat 0.5 -- 6.0 ounces per square inch
  • jacobsondjacobsond Posts: 35Member
    A good solid base is what you need. How you achieve it its up to you. That plastic stuff that the HVAC guys tend to use does not seem to be a good solid base IMHO
    coming to you from warm and sunny ND
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