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Skimming question

nsummersnsummers Posts: 4Member
I found out that you're suppose to skim a new steam boiler ? because of the old crud that was in the system.

Can I just add a skim pipe and do it myself ? Any special pipe requirement ? I was going to have a plumber or go to home depot and pick one up.
TIA

Comments

  • SeanBeansSeanBeans Posts: 303Member
    You can add it if your willing to tackle the small project. Send us a photo of your boiler and people can give you tips and hints on getting it out and what size nipples/fittings to use.
  • nsummersnsummers Posts: 4Member
    I looked at the manual, it says 1.5", I think when I get home, Ill see if its actually not put in.
  • lchmblchmb Posts: 2,927Member
    how old is the system? Are you actually having issues? It should have been part of the install itself.
  • ethicalpaulethicalpaul Posts: 711Member
    edited April 10
    nsummers said:

    I found out that you're suppose to skim a new steam boiler ? because of the old crud that was in the system.

    Can I just add a skim pipe and do it myself ? Any special pipe requirement ? I was going to have a plumber or go to home depot and pick one up.
    TIA

    It's really the *new* gunk you are getting out -- the oils and whatever from the boiler manufacturing process, and the oil from any new piping. The old stuff from the system mostly drops to the bottom I think. Skimming is to remove the stuff that floats.

    The problem often is that the installer may leave the plug in the boiler cast iron and cover it up with the sheet metal jacket, but the folks here can help you find a way.

    Also post pics of your boiler from a few different angles to include the piping attached to the boiler...folks here will give you opinions about how well your installer did
    1 pipe Utica 112 in Cedar Grove, NJ, 1913 coal > oil > NG
  • BobCBobC Posts: 4,960Member
    If the skin port still has a factory plug in it they can be a bear to get out. You might be able to get the plug out but don't round off the corners of that plug trying to get it off, if you do it's going to be difficult to get it out. Time is money, you don't want to do anything that will make it harder for a plumber to get a stubborn plug out.

    Bob
    Smith G8-3 with EZ Gas @ 90,000 BTU, Single pipe steam
    Vaporstat with a 12oz cut-out and 4oz cut-in
    3PSI gauge
  • nsummersnsummers Posts: 4Member
    My laptop died, and this computer doesn't have photo editor to adjust gamma, so its a big dark.

    The right side of the boiler has no knock out, this is the left side. theres a big nut. Ill have to get light down there to take a better photo. To the left of the arrow is the sight glass.

    The boiler is a weils, I dont know the model, there seem to be several printed on the yellow sticky. Any way to tell which one ? maybe a serial or part number somewhere ?


  • nsummersnsummers Posts: 4Member

    It's really the *new* gunk you are getting out -- the oils and whatever from the boiler manufacturing process, and the oil from any new piping. The old stuff from the system mostly drops to the bottom I think. Skimming is to remove the stuff that floats.

    --

    If its old gunk on the bottom, how do you get rid of it ? drain and fill ?
  • JUGHNEJUGHNE Posts: 5,672Member
    If you find the model number you can download the install manual for that boiler. You implied it was new, how new?

    Skim port needs to be above the water line so you can slowly add water to float off the top oils. May take several times.

    Assuming that is the skim port, I would push the insulation into the jacket and do several applications over several days of PB blaster spray on the plug threads. Minor hammer whacks on the plug may help also.

    An 8 point socket (for square heads) that is a perfect match for the plug head with short extension and breaker bar may loosen it. As pointed out you do not want to round the corners off.
    If no success then a 1/2" impact drill would be next.

    Then a 3" nipple, full port ball valve, another nipple and a 90 to direct the water down. Use the removed plug to secure the opening when not in use. Just beyond hand tight.

    After skimming then you could drain the bottom off.
    You typically do not change all the water in a steamer.
    Fresh water will kill the cast iron.
    In any event after refilling you want to bring the boiler up to making steam to boil off oxygen in the new fresh water.
  • ethicalpaulethicalpaul Posts: 711Member
    edited April 12
    nsummers said:


    If its old gunk on the bottom, how do you get rid of it ? drain and fill ?

    As @JUGHNE said, I don't ever drain all the water, but what I do periodically is to drain _some_ water from a low point on the boiler and also from a low point on the wet return, just until it runs clear.

    I think the low point on the boiler is called the "mud leg" and is there to collect the heavy stuff so it can be easily flushed out. But I don't have a solid definition of "mud leg" having just heard it a few times.

    PS: a less closeup picture of that plug and/or the model number(s) on the manufacturer's sticker will let us pinpoint it for you
    1 pipe Utica 112 in Cedar Grove, NJ, 1913 coal > oil > NG
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