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Replace Split Baseboards with Panels?

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Hi folks,
This is a cool little forum you have here.
I just bought a foreclosed house from the bank - it has HWBB heat. Boiler seems ok, but the baseboards are split in numerous locations.
Obviously, those split baseboards will need to be replaced.
My question is, is it possible to replace the baseboards with those flat panel style radiators from, for example, Pensotti 1-to-1?
Are there factors I need to consider here?
Thanks!

Comments

  • Ironman
    Ironman Member Posts: 7,399
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    A lot more info is needed, particularly how it’s now piped, but my initial response would be “no”. Unless you wanna do a lot of repiping. You might also need a different control strategy.

    The BB elements can easily be replaced or repaired.
    Bob Boan
    You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.
  • boughtahouse
    boughtahouse Member Posts: 8
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    It seems to be piped in a big circuit around the perimeter of the house.
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 11,108
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    Are you able to see the piping in the basement?
    Some of that too may be split.
  • boughtahouse
    boughtahouse Member Posts: 8
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    I can see the pipe in the crawlspace, yeah. I'm going to get down there after work and see if I can find any other splits.
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 11,108
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    It seems that if the BB didn't drain....the highest point of piping...that things below it may have retained water also.

    How did the domestic water lines fare?
  • boughtahouse
    boughtahouse Member Posts: 8
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    Domestic water lines are working fine. I have them turned on and no leaks since I turned it on 2 weeks ago.
  • boughtahouse
    boughtahouse Member Posts: 8
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    Discovered more splits in the pipe in the crawlspace last night. It does seem to be designed as two big loops - one around the right half of the house and one around the left.

    I guess I'm going to become proficient at soldering copper pipe.
  • Intplm.
    Intplm. Member Posts: 2,083
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    When you have made all of the repairs and have tested everything for leaks, charge your system with antifreeze that is meant for hydronic heating. It will save you a lot of problems in the future.
  • boughtahouse
    boughtahouse Member Posts: 8
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    Is there a specific brand of antifreeze I should be using?
  • Intplm.
    Intplm. Member Posts: 2,083
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    A non toxic antifreeze like "No-Burst", "Utility" brands (there are others) that are meant for hot water boiler heating systems only. Do not use automotive antifreeze. Use whats meant for boilers only, Non-toxic.
    That should help prevent future freeze ups and the bursting of your pipes and radiators.
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 11,108
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    How about pictures of your boiler, pumps, zone valves and any control devices that are not a water valve or fitting.
    How many T-stats do you have?
    How are you sure the boiler did not freeze?
    Is there a tank type water heater near it in the basement?

    Glycol antifreeze will introduce it's own set of issues and most avoid it if at all possible.
    Maybe more insulation in the crawlspace in needed.
  • Intplm.
    Intplm. Member Posts: 2,083
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    @JUGHNE What problems are you concerned about with this person's system being protected with antifreeze?
    The OP says he is looking to change his split baseboard and has found his heating mains have split too. Certainly insulating the crawl space is ideal, but what issues are you referring to? I've been using antifreeze in boilers for some 40 years now with no problems.
  • boughtahouse
    boughtahouse Member Posts: 8
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    I had a guy look at the boiler itself, he indicated that it is fine.

    I will provide some pictures after work today.

    I have two thermostats at opposite ends of the house, which seem to correspond to the two loops and two pumps.

    I have a relatively new (3 years) tank water heater immediately next to the boiler.
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 11,108
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    The glycol systems I have seen mostly have leaks at threaded fittings, pumps...air vents plugged... relief valve testing usually meant replacement as they will not reseat.
    Some soldered joints even show seepage.
    Maybe it is because most things I look at are old.

    Then adding another factor of complexity to the system....costs...future testing.....renewal etc.

    I am thinking that the heating copper did not get winterized properly. The domestic piping survived, maybe it was in a warmer part of the basement.
    If the boiler and NBP survived then BB piping could have had a high point not allowing even partial draining.

    Maybe necessary, but this was an abandoned house as far as heat goes. If the piping is full of repair couplings from previous freezing when the house was occupied and heated then that is another consideration. IMO
  • boughtahouse
    boughtahouse Member Posts: 8
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    The splits in the baseboard pipes seem to be only on horizontal runs, if that helps.
  • KC_Jones
    KC_Jones Member Posts: 5,750
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    I just bought a foreclosed house from the bank !

    I'm going to take a wild guess and say this is why it froze and split, not because it was lacking glycol.
    2014 Weil Mclain EG-40
    EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Boiler Control
    Boiler pictures updated 2/21/15
  • Intplm.
    Intplm. Member Posts: 2,083
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    Agreed that it was probably abandoned by the former owner causing the heating system to freeze and split.
    Why the rest of the pipes on the domestic didn't freeze is odd.

    When the directions are followed with the proper amount of glycol used, the problems with seepage etc. are rare. Those issues might occur when to much glycol is added.
    The above OP, and with further posted discovery suggested that he use glycol after all repairs and leak tests are made.