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Need to by a transfer pump. Got any suggestions?

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Duff
Duff Member Posts: 61
I have to buy a transfer pump to add in some Inhibited Propylene Glycol into the boiler water. It's only a 2 story residential house. There are so many choices it's making me nuts! House has 2 zones and I need only about 12 feet of head. Can someone give me some input. Thanks, Dennis

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  • SuperTech
    SuperTech Member Posts: 2,205
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    I have used a cheap little white transfer pump in the past with great results. I was able to pump 15 five gallon buckets of glycol to a large office building with it once. I don't know what brand it was. The transfer pump by Liberty is faster and more robust, but it might be more pump than you need for the job.
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 15,840
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    I agree with @SuperTech about the pumps.

    Why not drain the system of water and calculate what you need first. Then find out how much water your boiler holds You won't need that much. You can probably drain the boiler and piping then add as much glycol to the drained boiler as you can by removing the relief valve and using that tapping. Then fill the rest with water and let it rip, putting the relief valve back n first

    Check it out with a few calculations before buying a pump.

    Harbor freight has a cheap pump for $60
  • Duff
    Duff Member Posts: 61
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    I was in Harbor freight this morning at 8am when the doors opened to check out that $60 pump, it made me start this thread on the wall!
    Boiler manufacturer says not to pump in chemicals thru the boiler. There are bleeds on the returns and they isolate the boiler completely. Installer must of read the manual. Amazon has a Wayne PC4, 1/2 Hp electric that looks to be ok, I'm almost tempted to just use my drill pump.
  • nicholas bonham-carter
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    How will you know how much Glycol to put in if you don’t know the exact volume of the system?
    Ed’s method seems to solve that problem, and adding the glycol first would protect against freezing during the refilling.
    Another thing to consider: is the glycol needed?—NBC
    Duff
  • SuperTech
    SuperTech Member Posts: 2,205
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    I would avoid the glycol unless absolutely necessary. It tends to become acidic over time, needing replacement. It also seems to make zone valves, air vents and other hydronic components fail prematurely. I consider it a necessary evil, something to be used only if the piping is in an unheated space, such as a hydro air unit in an attic.
  • Tinman
    Tinman Member Posts: 2,808
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    I used the Wayne, 1/2 hp cast iron pumps.

    Steve Minnich
  • Zman
    Zman Member Posts: 7,607
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    Saw one of these on a job the other day.
    The guy swore by it...
    https://www.milwaukeetool.com/Products/Power-Tools/Plumbing-Installation/Transfer-Pumps/2771-20
    "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough"
    Albert Einstein
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 22,482
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    I agree, unless you have outdoor piping or plan on leaving the home empty during freezing weather, skip the glycol.

    An inexpensive, but slow transfer pump are those drill motor garden hose types seen at box stores. Fine for an intermittent use, no pressure fill.
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
  • Duff
    Duff Member Posts: 61
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    A big thank you to all who responded. I have figured the total liner footage of this system and have a total gallon capacity. That being said my intention is to add only 20% of inhibitor so just to protect the condensing boiler from limestone deposits and any galvanic corrosion. Freezing is not a major concern in this case as much as protecting the boiler. As I read all your post I can't help but wonder how many years of experience went into all the replies. As for me 46 years, just retired. And YOU?
    Thanks to all, Dennis
  • nicholas bonham-carter
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    There must be better additives to control bad water chemistry.
    A hot water boiler should never use fresh water, so the calcium problem is nonexistent, and galvanic corrosion is more likely in certain joints and connection.
    Do a search of the Fernox, or Rhomar website, for better solutions-maybe even send them a sample of your city water for analysis.—NBC
    SuperTechTinmanDuff
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 22,482
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    test your water to be safe. I think all boiler manufacturers suggest 5-12 Gpg maximum on the hardness or warranty is void, that includes initial fill water
    It is always advisable to fix the water before it goes in to limit dependency on chemicals to fix your water
    Hardness and TDS are the numbers to pay attention to, consult your boiler manual for actual spec
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
  • GroundUp
    GroundUp Member Posts: 1,957
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    I use a Wayne 1/2 HP cast iron for most things, can't beat them but they are a PITA to prime and are pretty messy when playing with glycol. I bought the Milwaukee cordless one about a month ago and while it definitely moves water, it SUCKS for building pressure in a hydronic system- not unlike the drill pump. Good for filling and flushing but the final pressurization needs something else, whether a real transfer pump or domestic pressure