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Burner sound cover

My oil boiler has a Beckett burner and came with a plastic cover that mounts on a bracket...I took it off awhile back...does the cover provide any safety protection (carbon monoxide prevention or otherwise) or is the cover simply to reduce noise...in other words is it okay for me to leave the cover off?

Comments

  • Robert O'BrienRobert O'Brien Member Posts: 3,106
    You can leave it off, but why?
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  • Tigers123Tigers123 Member Posts: 6
    It got damaged when I removed it to reset furnace. So it is just for sound/ aesthetics?
  • Robert O'BrienRobert O'Brien Member Posts: 3,106
    Tigers123 said:

    It got damaged when I removed it to reset furnace. So it is just for sound/ aesthetics?

    Yes
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  • STEVEusaPASTEVEusaPA Member Posts: 2,846
    How damaged? Got a pic?
    steve
  • Tigers123Tigers123 Member Posts: 6
    Just cracked a bit
  • LeonardLeonard Member Posts: 827
    edited February 19
    On a car's cracked plastic I put Strip of sheet metal on each side as a washer , and pop rioted it. Plastic was soft, without strip the rivots would pull out of the plastic .... Used to do bodywork as a kid.
  • Tigers123Tigers123 Member Posts: 6
    That is a great idea Leonard, maybe i’ll Try that. With all the fear about CO poisoning I just wanted to make sure that it doesn’t somehow get out of the burn chamber back through the burner somehow without the cover
  • Jamie HallJamie Hall Member Posts: 10,379
    The cover -- or lack of it -- won't affect CO production much, if any -- accurately setting the burner with the proper tools is what you want for that, and adequate draught (to burner specs!) will make sure that any which might be produced won't get into the house.

    Not a bad idea to have a CO alarm anyway, though...
    Jamie



    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England.



    Hoffman Equipped System (all original except boiler), Weil-Mclain 580, 2.75 gph Carlin, Vapourstat 0.5 -- 6.0 ounces per square inch
  • Tigers123Tigers123 Member Posts: 6
    That is helpful Jamie, thanks. Can you explain adequate draught and how that is measured?
  • LeonardLeonard Member Posts: 827
    edited February 19
    They have special flexible epoxys , equivalent to ridgid bondo for sheet metal, available at car body repair shop suppliers. I use flexible (when cured) SEM "problem plastic epoxy" ( some car plastics are harder to bond to---cars) . Car bondo being rigid would crack off flexible plastics , like plastic car bumpers and lower car body panels.

    On cars can vee and epoxy over the crack , or maybe rivet the joint together then fill area with this flexible epoxy. Then sand, prime, and paint, can look like a new piece if your good.
  • Jamie HallJamie Hall Member Posts: 10,379
    edited February 19
    Tigers123 said:

    That is helpful Jamie, thanks. Can you explain adequate draught and how that is measured?

    When you -- or, much more likely, a technician -- adjusts the burner, one of the criteria for correct adjustment is the draught -- the slight pressure differences which make the combustion gasses move through the boiler and up the chimney or out the vent. One wants enough draught -- otherwise the flame doesn't burn cleanly and the combustion gasses can't escape. On the other hand, one doesn't want too much, which would disturb the flame pattern (think blowing out a candle!). The right amount is specific to the boiler and burner combination. It is set by adjusting the air shutters on the burner and, often, by a damper on the vent or chimney, and there is a rather simple device called a manometer which is just a gauge for measuring small differences in air pressure which the tech. will use.

    And don't jump all over me, guys -- that's a simplified explanation!
    Jamie



    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England.



    Hoffman Equipped System (all original except boiler), Weil-Mclain 580, 2.75 gph Carlin, Vapourstat 0.5 -- 6.0 ounces per square inch
  • STEVEusaPASTEVEusaPA Member Posts: 2,846

    I wouldn't use epoxies. What if they are flammable and now you have it outgassing right into the burner inlet and getting ignited.
    I would use duct sealing tape on the inside where the cracks are located (not duct tape, but the thicker, stickier tape).
    If it can't be fixed with tape, get a new one.

    Considering most manufacturer's recommend adjusting the burner air settings with the cover on, I'd fix it, and get a qualified tech to do a proper set up.

    I'd also call a qualified tech when your burner goes off on reset. Unless you ran out of oil, it shut off for a reason and needs to be checked out to figure out why.
    If you did run out of oil, then it needs to be properly bled.
    Best left to a professional.
    Customers of mine who like to work/play with their own burners don't remain customers very long.
    steve
  • LeonardLeonard Member Posts: 827
    edited February 19
    Epoxys I've used don't seem to give off flammable fumes AFTER they are cured. Might Stink for a day or two. Suspect cured epoxy is no more flammable than plastic of a case .Suppose you can do your own test, cure some and after few days put a match to it to see for yourself. Mix it well so it ALL cures.

  • Tigers123Tigers123 Member Posts: 6
    thanks for your input Steve, I am definitely not experienced with burners so I will listen to the pros on this site. I just had the burner serviced, with the cover off, is it okay if I just leave the plastic cover off now until next servicing? My technician didn't say anything about needing to have one on, and we don't mind the sound, I take it some customers run their units without covers and it isn't a safety issue or anything?
  • STEVEusaPASTEVEusaPA Member Posts: 2,846
    You're fine. Just make sure if you do use it, the combustion test is done with it on.
    Again...don't waste time with epoxies. Use the tape, spend your free time doing anything else.
    steve
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