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drilling through a stone facade, need a 2.5" or 3" hole (Ductless)

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GW
GW Member Posts: 4,700
edited February 2019 in THE MAIN WALL
got a job where i may try and drill through a stone facade, residential, 1970s home (maybe 1960's don't really know.

Any pros and cons? tools? I'm happy to spend dough on tools.
Gary Wilson
Wilson Services, Inc
Northampton, MA
gary@wilsonph.com

Comments

  • Intplm.
    Intplm. Member Posts: 1,997
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    @GW if you have a well supplied rental company near you. Rent one of those hole core boring drills.
    If you already have the drill just get the bit you need at a lesser cost. They can be rented but can be hit or miss as to how messed up they have become from so much use. So maybe buy the bit if you already have the appropriate sized drill.
    Mike
  • GroundUp
    GroundUp Member Posts: 1,924
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    Yup, go rent a handheld dry core drill and punch it through. Easy peasy unless there's granite in it, that takes a little sweat equity
  • GW
    GW Member Posts: 4,700
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    thanks, can you paste me a link if i just want to buy the stuff?
    Gary Wilson
    Wilson Services, Inc
    Northampton, MA
    gary@wilsonph.com
  • GW
    GW Member Posts: 4,700
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    OK thanks Fred. OK if it's 2000-3000 I may as well hire a Pro; It's rare that I need this.

    Thanks all for your comments
    Gary Wilson
    Wilson Services, Inc
    Northampton, MA
    gary@wilsonph.com
  • GroundUp
    GroundUp Member Posts: 1,924
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    It's literally 30 bucks to rent a drill here, and you can punch a hole like that in 5 minutes, I drill them on a very regular basis. Just a thought
    GW
  • GW
    GW Member Posts: 4,700
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    OK do you do wet or dry? Do you bolt it to the wall? Ive never done this. I do have a core bit(s), drilled hundreds of holes though concrete in my plumber days (5"), hand-held drill
    Gary Wilson
    Wilson Services, Inc
    Northampton, MA
    gary@wilsonph.com
  • GroundUp
    GroundUp Member Posts: 1,924
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    Depending on the material and depth, either/or. If it's just the facade, 3-4" thick, I'd run a handheld dry core. Anchoring it to the wall will be very tough to keep square on a facade, and you have the hole from the anchor there forever. It's tough to get a handheld started, so you'll want some sort of sawhorse or shelf to rest the bit on for starting or it will jump all over the place. Once it's started, push hard and hang on
  • woodrow
    woodrow Member Posts: 40
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    do you have a rotary hammer sds you can get the hiltis at the depot probably 300.00 for the bit and the arbor mine has variable speed you can start it low some have a centering bit cut a 2x6 drill a hole through it a little bigger than your bit screw it to the rim board to get it started
  • GW
    GW Member Posts: 4,700
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    Groundup OK cool, I think i can handle making a jig to keep the bit in place while I wrangle it in. Thanks for the advice
    Gary Wilson
    Wilson Services, Inc
    Northampton, MA
    gary@wilsonph.com
  • GW
    GW Member Posts: 4,700
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    woodrow said:

    do you have a rotary hammer sds you can get the hiltis at the depot probably 300.00 for the bit and the arbor mine has variable speed you can start it low some have a centering bit cut a 2x6 drill a hole through it a little bigger than your bit screw it to the rim board to get it started

    Yes i have a 20 year old Bosch with SDS and variable speed trigger. I will check with BIG HD and see what they have.

    Thanks for the advice
    Gary Wilson
    Wilson Services, Inc
    Northampton, MA
    gary@wilsonph.com
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 15,614
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    Gary,

    There is a guy in the area that used to work for W---h E-------t. He is cheap we use him all the time.

    Don't have his # but will get it tomorrow and message you if I don't forget
  • GW
    GW Member Posts: 4,700
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    Ok got it the dudes that fly around on bristled sticks lol I will look for your message thanks
    Gary Wilson
    Wilson Services, Inc
    Northampton, MA
    gary@wilsonph.com
  • ratio
    ratio Member Posts: 3,649
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    Just as a data point, I got a Chinese wet drill for IIRC $150ish & a 4" wet core bit for $30 (yes that's right) from eBay when I wanted to move the flue to my water heater to a different side of my chimney. I let some of the smoke out of the drill, but it made the hole I needed just fine; & I'll bet there's a few more holes left in her.
  • Tinman
    Tinman Member Posts: 2,808
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    I always drilled my own. Lots of 100 year old churches with stone anywhere from 14-20”. I’d always spot a small hole to confirm my location.
    Buying the big Bosch is a one time deal. Hiring someone repeats itself. 6” bits I rented because I only needed it once or twice maybe.
    Steve Minnich
  • Emisivity
    Emisivity Member Posts: 6
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    You probably already know this but if the stone facade has mortar joints it is much easier to drill through the joints than the facade itself. Plus it allows for future repair and adjustments where drilling through the stone is not really repairable.
  • Tinman
    Tinman Member Posts: 2,808
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    100 year old churches don't have stone facades. The stone itself is 18" deep. The spotter bit always goes through a mortar joint.
    Steve Minnich
  • GW
    GW Member Posts: 4,700
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    Ok thanks I’m able to move the hole a bit right and left, up and down.

    So it’s bteee to get the pilot on the mortar? I would be afraid the pilot hole might “get bigger”?
    Gary Wilson
    Wilson Services, Inc
    Northampton, MA
    gary@wilsonph.com
  • GroundUp
    GroundUp Member Posts: 1,924
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    You don't want the edge of the hole in a mortar joint if it can be avoided. The "get bigger" fear of yours is a real thing, some worse than others depending on the mason and mud condition. If the stone is large enough, I'd try to avoid a joint altogether if possible
  • GW
    GW Member Posts: 4,700
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    Ok great thanks
    Gary Wilson
    Wilson Services, Inc
    Northampton, MA
    gary@wilsonph.com