Click here to Find a Contractor in your area.
Welcome! Here are the website rules, as well as some tips for using this forum.

If you've found help here, check back in to let us know how everything worked out.
It's a great way to thank those who helped you.
Need to contact us? Visit https://heatinghelp.com/contact-us/.

B&G Hydrotrol flow control valves

RetrosPexRetrosPex Posts: 56Member
Is anyone familiar with B&G Hydrotrol valves that can comment on their use in radiant systems? Possibly versus using check valves that come with some circulators such as Grundfos? Years ago, when setting up a system in a very tall 1800's house, I was advised to remove the check valves from small Grundfos circulators, and instead use the B&G Hydrotrol to prevent gravity circulation.

I'm working out my layout for my single story ranch house system, with the boiler in the basement. There are not any significant height issues. There will be some remote mounted manifolds to serve nearby heating loads, with some sort of zone actuator, and a Grundfos Alpha 2. Is there any advantage to using the Hydrotrol valve in that application? I have some left over, that are NIB. If not, I'll put them up for sale on this site. In our first project, we had multiple pumps, each with a Hydrotrol and bypass. I don't know how this would work with just one circulator, and 5-6 zones. Use one in conjunction with a zone valve?

Thanks for any input!

Comments

  • RetrosPexRetrosPex Posts: 56Member
    Darn, I think I posted this in the wrong category. Sorry
  • IronmanIronman Posts: 5,084Member
    We use only the flow checks supplied with the circs and have no issues. Should one go bad, we always install isolation flanges with the circulator, so it's easy to fix.
    Bob Boan


    You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.
  • IronmanIronman Posts: 5,084Member
    You don't wanna install any kind of check if you use zone valves. Doing so causes that part of the system to be isolated from the expansion tank when that zone(s) are off. As it cools, the pressure will drop and it can even go into a vacuum. When the valve opens with 20 psi on the other side...kaboom!
    Bob Boan


    You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.
  • Erin Holohan HaskellErin Holohan Haskell Posts: 1,087Member, Moderator, Administrator
    edited January 30
    RetrosPex said:

    Darn, I think I posted this in the wrong category. Sorry

    Moved it. Thanks!
    President
    HeatingHelp.com
  • RetrosPexRetrosPex Posts: 56Member
    Ironman: thank you for that info; I had no idea. I assume from your comment that it is okay to leave the check valve in the circulator, however?
  • IronmanIronman Posts: 5,084Member
    Not if a zone valve(s) are used.
    Bob Boan


    You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.
  • RetrosPexRetrosPex Posts: 56Member
    Ironman: Thank you for that clarification. Wow.
  • IronmanIronman Posts: 5,084Member
    It's check valves or zone valves, but not both.
    Bob Boan


    You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.
  • RetrosPexRetrosPex Posts: 56Member
    Thank you Ironman!
Sign In or Register to comment.

Welcome

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!