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Natural Gas line vent, Shutoffs...

D107D107 Posts: 1,581Member
Or gas meter is in our basement, and from the regulator there's a 20+ ft long 3/4" line to our outside wall exiting about 40 inches above the ground. Where it exits the house at the approximate height on the corresponding inside wall is a small grill, (3" x5") which is apparently open to the air since in this windy weather today I can feel a little breeze blowing. GIven that it's also near the plumbing stack vent, I'm thinking perhaps this is not a vent for the gas line but for the plumbing stack(?). GIven the investment we've put into insulation, I would like to cover this grill but not before I get some advice. Is the indoor grill for internal pressure relief during a gas leak?

Also in looking to attach a wrench or vice grip to either the meter or regulator's emergency shutoff valve, the regulator's shutoff looks easier--easier to reach and on a horizontal plane. I would assume either shutoff would do the job. Any preferences?

Comments

  • kcoppkcopp Posts: 3,355Member
    post a picture... but from your description Do Not block any vents. They may be vital to your heating system properly working and combustion air.
  • Jamie HallJamie Hall Posts: 11,191Member
    The little grille is almost certainly a sewer vent. If there is a house trap, it may be for that trap. I'd be a little wary about covering it, as ventilation is needed for sewer lines to function properly.

    Around here, at least, the gas company isn't really enthusiastic about having homeowners having wrenches -- never mind a more or less permanent handle on the emergency shutoff. It may sound silly, but their concern -- which has some merit -- is that when the gas is shut off, all the pilot lights go out, and when it is turned on it is necessary to restart, properly, all the appliances. And they are worried that maybe the average homeowner might have trouble doing that...
    Jamie

    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England.

    Hoffman Equipped System (all original except boiler), Weil-Mclain 580, 2.75 gph Carlin, Vapourstat 0.5 -- 6.0 ounces per square inch
  • D107D107 Posts: 1,581Member
    edited January 21
    Thanks. see attached photo.



    That's the plumbing stack very near house trap below the grille covered by sheetrock leading to outside vent.

    Completely understand about gas co. concerns. I've never had to use any such shutoff but in an old house like this it may be a good precaution. Generally I don't go near such equipment except to photograph it for questions or to put a label on the access door so any responders could quickly identify location of gas, electric and water shutoffs.
  • Jamie HallJamie Hall Posts: 11,191Member
    Almost certainly a vent for the sewer system. It would be nice to keep such draughts out, but... it's needed.
    Jamie

    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England.

    Hoffman Equipped System (all original except boiler), Weil-Mclain 580, 2.75 gph Carlin, Vapourstat 0.5 -- 6.0 ounces per square inch
  • Intplm.Intplm. Posts: 938Member
    @D107.
    Cant really tell what that grill is for until you remove it from the wall.
    It may indeed be a vent pipe for your drainage system that is a part of your plumbing drain pipes.
    I would guess that you have something called a "Sure Vent" or "Studor Vent" behind that grill. They are air admittance valves used on DWV systems.
    Send a picture of what is behind that grill.
  • D107D107 Posts: 1,581Member
    edited January 21
    See photo.



    Well now not sure what that grille is for. Looks like between sheetrock and brick foundation wall they have stuffed styrofoam, which is similar to what they did in the rest of the basement. The plumbing stack rises from around where the house trap is, and I can understand why you need a vent to the OUTSIDE there. Tomorrow I'll take a photo of the outside gas regulator vent but meanwhile it looks something like this other photo but only red. looks like vents at a 90º el.


  • Intplm.Intplm. Posts: 938Member
    You might have to reach in and feel around and remove some of the insulation. Whatever is in there might be lower than the grill.

    A bit confusing at this point.

    Ideally plumbing DWV stacks terminate through the roof.
    I don't know what the device on the outside is yet.
  • Intplm.Intplm. Posts: 938Member
    Might be a exterior termination vent cover for a gas regulator?
  • D107D107 Posts: 1,581Member
    @Intplm. Yes, that last photo is as you say. Our plumbing stack does terminate through the roof, but there is a plumbing vent or house trap vent that terminates through the brick outside with a circular vent cover with many holes.
  • FredFred Posts: 8,061Member
    Are you sure that is venting anything? It almost looks like someone cut a hole in the wall to install something and rather than cover over it, they installed that vent cover to act like a "Hand Hole" that utility companies use where they think they may need access at a later date. Hand hole where one needs to reach in, Man hole where a person may need to climb in or down.
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