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Replacement Condensate Tank

Have cast iron condensate tank with leak . Must be replaced. Unable to find a label or other ID to order replacement. Have recently replaced both the pump and float switch, so a complete, new assembly is not appealing. Am optimistic with the brain trust here someone may be familiar with the make and model. Thanks in advance.

Comments

  • HVACNUT
    HVACNUT Member Posts: 4,195
    Doesn't look promising but you should kiss whoever invented unions.
    Jason QuinnVTsteam
  • Intplm.
    Intplm. Member Posts: 1,336
    VTsteam
    That just might be a "Skidmore" company product. Not appealing to put in a new "assembly"? as you put it.
    I will tell you that the best thing to do is to change the tank. Not as unappealing as you might think. You have unions installed on the vent, return and the discharge. This will make things much easier than if you didn't have them. But you probably already know that.
    I can see that from the picture it looks like the tags have rubbed off so the best thing to do is to look for a condensate tank with pump, that is as close to that size that you have as possible.
    You can buy some time if you like by using a type of tank sealant but not the best thing to do.
    I have changed quite a few of these tanks and they do not have to be a direct foot print for replacement. They don't have to be exact in there replacement.
    I've used a company called "Skidmore". Check them out. There are others as well.
    Best of luck. No easy answers for a repair.
    VTsteam
  • gerry gill
    gerry gill Member Posts: 3,010
    Tank should be steel. How about weld the leak hole?
    gwgillplumbingandheating.com
    Serving Cleveland's eastern suburbs from Cleveland Heights down to Cuyahoga Falls.

  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 10,290
    Measure the height x width x length of the tank in inches as reasonably close as you can and divide the answer by 1728. That gives you the cubic ft capacity of the tank. Take that answer and divide by 231 will give you the capacity in gallons of water.

    Or size it based on the boiler capacity/evaporation rate.

    Call your supplier. Hoffman, Skidmore are popular and there are others. You can buy cast iron or steel. Cast iron is better but more $$

    Tank that small isn't worth screwing with just replace it
    VTsteam
  • Steamhead
    Steamhead Member Posts: 14,840
    What about switching to gravity return and doing away with the tank?
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Consulting
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 10,290
    The return into the tank is about "6 bricks higher" than then where the boiler feed pipe enters the boiler. That's probably 15" if that. With traps on the return no steam pressure to assist you can't get water back into the boiler without a pump. Either way the pump is a lot cheaper than the repiping it would need.
    VTsteam
  • Steamhead
    Steamhead Member Posts: 14,840
    Are there steam-carrying pipes within where the "B" dimension would be, i.e. 30" above the waterline or less, before they connect to the drips?
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Consulting
  • VTsteam
    VTsteam Member Posts: 37
    Thanks for the invaluable feedback and suggestions. Will be ordering a new condensate tank/pump this week. Will be following up on the Skidmore hint.
    The initial photo was unintentionally misleading. Was taken before plumbing up the new boiler. Here is an image taken today. Have a return line 6" below the waterline so a return pump becomes necessary.
    Double D
  • Steamhead
    Steamhead Member Posts: 14,840
    edited December 2018
    As long as that return is below the boiler's waterline, it'll return by gravity. It's when a return is just above the waterline that we have problems.

    But, whatever..................
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Consulting
    Intplm.
  • Intplm.
    Intplm. Member Posts: 1,336
    Hope that Skidmore can help. They have offered tanks with multiple ports to help adapt to many different types of installations. The many ports on some of theses tanks should help with your installation. Be sure to ask for a tank that meets your current measurements or, a multi-port tank. Good lock.
  • gerry gill
    gerry gill Member Posts: 3,010
    i've had zero luck on getting any manufacturers support from Skidmore..just so you know..
    gwgillplumbingandheating.com
    Serving Cleveland's eastern suburbs from Cleveland Heights down to Cuyahoga Falls.

    Intplm.
  • neilc
    neilc Member Posts: 1,462
    edited December 2018
    I can't see why you need that tank from these pictures,
    pipe the return to the tank, back to the tee where the small pumped return is now.
    well, Hartford loop, low point drains, and all
    Intplm.
  • Intplm.
    Intplm. Member Posts: 1,336
    Sorry to hear that. But I will admit that I have had issues with them as well. I just keep after them. Some reps are more responsive than others. There are other companies that might be of more help if Skidmore falls short. You just have to keep looking.
    Hopefully contacting a good supply house can get the right tank .
  • Intplm.
    Intplm. Member Posts: 1,336
    VTsteam...........neilc and Steamhead make some very good points.
    So let me ask. Is the condensate pump/tank receiving or discharging condensate to or from anything other than the boiler??
    You may still need to change the tank but give the job one more look.
  • Pumpguy
    Pumpguy Member Posts: 501
    I do not recognize this tank. It does not look like any Skidmore tank I have seen.

    For condensate pump receiver tanks, cast iron is always better than steel.

    Typical corrode through warranty on cast iron tanks is 20 years, while there is no corrode through warranty on steel tanks. IME, these thin wall steel tanks corrode through in 10 years or so.

    Typical wall thickness for steel tanks is only 3/16", while cast iron tanks have 1/2" wall thickness.
    Dennis Pataki. Former Service Manager and Heating Pump Product Manager for Nash Engineering Company. Phone: 1-888 853 9963
    Website: www.nashjenningspumps.com

    The first step in solving any problem is TO IDENTIFY THE PROBLEM.