Click here to Find a Contractor in your area.
Welcome! Here are the website rules, as well as some tips for using this forum.
Need to contact us? Visit https://heatinghelp.com/contact-us/.

carbon ceramic seal B&G 100 series

I had a very small water drip coming out of my B&G circulator, 100 series. I took the pump apart and the mechanical seal was only a carbon disc turning against a cast iron face. I was expecting a ceramic disc to mate with the carbon. I hesitate to repair using only the carbon piece that I would think not "seal" against the cast iron face that certainly doesn't have a mirror like finish. How common is this?

Comments

  • HVACNUT
    HVACNUT Member Posts: 4,018
    So common you should throw it in the scrap heap and get yourself a wet rotor circ.
    The B&G 100 has been around a long long time and they do offer a replacement bearing assembly if your just looking to tinker. Replace the coupling while your in there.
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 15,344
    It needs the ceramic ring to work.
    Retired and loving it.
  • pecmsg
    pecmsg Member Posts: 2,130
    HVACNUT said:



    The B&G 100 has been around a long long time and they do offer a replacement bearing assembly if your just looking to tinker. Replace the coupling while your in there.

    and the rubber feet that hold the motor in line
  • Pumpguy
    Pumpguy Member Posts: 460
    edited July 2018
    While a ceramic is the most common type of stationary component of a mechanical shaft seal, at least IME, NiResist is also used. NiResist looks for all the world like cast iron, but it is a legitimate shaft seal component material.

    In addition to ceramic and NiResist, Tungsten carbide and silicon carbide are used too.

    For me, given the choice for normal heating applications, I would go with the ceramic. For high temperature applications, TC or SC are frequently used.

    When changing a mechanical shaft seal, both the rotary carbon and the stationary element should be replaced together.

    Hope this answer is helpful.
    Dennis Pataki. Former Service Manager and Heating Pump Product Manager for Nash Engineering Company. Phone: 1-888 853 9963
    Website: www.nashjenningspumps.com

    The first step in solving any problem is TO IDENTIFY THE PROBLEM.
  • unclejohn
    unclejohn Member Posts: 1,730
    All you need is the bearing assembly. Any supply house.