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Ozone Washer System... Any Good?

NY_Rob
NY_Rob Member Posts: 1,370
A work associate recently had his home washing machine replaced, the salesperson at the appliance store recommended a "Ozone Washer System" so he would no longer need to use detergent or bleach in the washing machine. My friend had been buying his appliances from this particular salesperson for 20+ years now, he trusts his advise and wants to purchase the $$$ unit.
I've never heard of these devices or the claims they make, so I figured this would be a great place to see if any regulars here use/install/recommend these devices.

Thanks..

This is very similar to the one the appliance store is recommending..

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00AUWTYN2/?coliid=I3VVL0YTJ1G9Q7&colid=31O01TABWUU15&psc=0&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it


Comments

  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 16,654
    I've not used one, so I'm just thinking in more general terms. I have, however, considerable experience in using ozone for wastewater treatment. That said...

    Ozone is a powerful oxidizer. It is really good at killing bacteria. It is also a good bleach for dissolved organic materials and many dyes. I would imagine that for some types of washing -- clothes that were primarily just worn to, say, and office or school, perhaps -- it might work well enough. Clothes which were worn to, say, fix a car or for heavy work (sweaty, truly dirty, etc.) I just can't see it doing the job. I could be wrong. In the wastewater business, it is used after the grit removal and primary clarifier stages, and at least as much because it raises the dissolved oxygen levels which the little critters that actually destroy the waste material need to breath as for any direct action.
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
  • NY_Rob
    NY_Rob Member Posts: 1,370
    Thanks Jamie,
    You pretty much stated what reviewers have said... for normal everyday wash without actual ground in dirt/grease no detergent or bleach is needed, but for heavy dirt/grease, etc... still add some detergent.

    So instead of using detergent for every load, maybe you only need detergent for one load every other week? Seems like a pretty good idea to me, and good for the environment too....

  • Leonard
    Leonard Member Posts: 903
    edited July 2018
    Never used it , but I try it on some clothes you don't care about first. Strikes me it might act as strong bleach and might be rough on clothes, chemically.

    Was using a bleach on dad's (99) clothes, the cotton underwear didn't last long ~ 6 months before they started falling apart. was using a laundry detergent capfull, same amount of clorox as laundry detergent.
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 16,654
    Leonard said:

    Never used it , but I try it on some clothes you don't care about first. Strikes me it might act as strong bleach and might be rough on clothes, chemically.

    Was using a bleach on dad's (99) clothes, the cotton underwear didn't last long ~ 6 months before they started falling apart. was using a laundry detergent capfull, same amount of clorox as laundry detergent.

    Good point, @Leonard . Slipped my mind. I'd be very cautious using it on anything with spandex or rubber elastic...
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
  • Leonard
    Leonard Member Posts: 903
    edited July 2018
    The Clorox killed elastic band in underwear waist then later killed cotton T-shirts too. When put them on they would rip, cotton lost it's strength. Guess it chemically burned the cloth.

    It faded out colored clothes and prints too. I eventually used ~ 1/3 the dose of Clorox, it still removed dad's BO, and clothes lasted much longer.

    In past when I didn't know any better I was washing a carpet on pavement outside. Carpet was wet , I poured some full strength Clorox on it, (~ 1/4 jug !!!) , and some laundry detergent ,mopped it around, let it sit, then vac cleaner thru rinse.

    When I was done Clorox had chemically burned green synthetic (plastic fiber ) carpet, added a light brown hue to it on edge I poured full strength Clorox on ....ruined. Believe Clorox is an oxidizer as ozone is , but as I found out with the carpet it all depends on dosage. (dilute with water before applying)

    Ozone might work ok in a low dose. If you can return it , could try it.

    Problem is I find ozone annoying. Had to stop using an high-voltage electrostatic precipitation to remove smoke as it was kicking off too much ozone. They all seemed to be the same.
  • NY_Rob
    NY_Rob Member Posts: 1,370
    Thanks Leonard,

    The product reviews on Amazon are mostly positive, but there are people who give it 5 stars because it arrived in two days, others give it one star because UPS crushed the box... and still others who don't know the difference between clean and soiled cloths so it's difficult to judge by reviews alone.


    My buddy had his new washer delivered over the weekend, but the installer refused to install the ozone device stating "they all leak... and I get charged back if someone has to go back and fix my install".
    The device got returned to the appliance store for a refund and that's where it stands at this point. My buddy won't install it because now he's afraid it will leak and flood his laundry room and the basement below.

    I'm still on the fence about getting one for our house, hopefully someone who owns one will chime in give it a thumbs up or down....
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 16,654
    I have never tried such a thing -- and wouldn't, having worked extensively with ozone in water treatment and wastewater treatment. By the time the concentration is high enough to do anything at all to the grundge on the clothes, it will also be high enough to pretty well demolish most of the rest of the organic material... such as wool, spandex, cotton... not to mention, as others have, the seals and gaskets.

    I suspect the apparent affect of the product has to do with its action as a bleach -- it is a good bleach -- but "white" is not necessarily "clean".
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
  • Intplm.
    Intplm. Member Posts: 1,331
    I have installed commercial-type units in commercial laundry systems and have found them to be quite good. They also seem to freshen the air in the rooms they are in.
    That said. If residentially they are coming around to the consumer with similar results from the commercial units, then it wouldn't surprise me if we see more and more of this in the near future.
  • Ctoilman
    Ctoilman Member Posts: 105
    I don't try anything 'new technology' until well proven in the field.  So after 10 yrs or so I might give it a shot, I'm no guinea pig.  At this point I wouldn't even consider some science-experiment washing machine.  
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 11,865
    Ctoilman said:

    I don't try anything 'new technology' until well proven in the field.  So after 10 yrs or so I might give it a shot, I'm no guinea pig.  At this point I wouldn't even consider some science-experiment washing machine.  

    How's WIndows XP working out for you or are you still on ME?
    Intplm. said:

    I have installed commercial-type units in commercial laundry systems and have found them to be quite good. They also seem to freshen the air in the rooms they are in.
    That said. If residentially they are coming around to the consumer with similar results from the commercial units, then it wouldn't surprise me if we see more and more of this in the near future.

    I'm confused,
    Do these not require any rinsing? It seems like every time the washer pulls water, it's getting the same thing, whatever that is. I guess it's not really soap?

    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment