Click here to Find a Contractor in your area.
In fairness to all, we don't discuss pricing on the Wall. Thanks for your cooperation.
Need to contact us? Visit https://heatinghelp.com/contact-us/.

Favorite Tool Bag or Back Pack?

RayWohlfarthRayWohlfarth Member Posts: 430
I just recently had my Popeye moment. That's the time when I rant, "thats alls I can stand cause I cant stand no mores."
I have gone through different ways of holding my hand tools in my career and each has been a frustrating disappointment. I started with the metal tool box and it got too heavy. I used a bucket for a while and usually ended up with my hand tools scattered over my truck. I now use a back pack which is easier to carry but my tools fall out of the pockets when it tips over and no I am not an aggresive driver. Just curious what you use to carry your hand tools.
Thanks all.
Ray
Ray Wohlfarth
Boiler Lessons
Click here to take Ray's class.
Click here to buy Ray's books.

Comments

  • kevinjkevinj Member Posts: 29
    I like a leather electricians pouch, just sling it over a shoulder to carry and set it the floor when working.

    I set it on the passenger side against the floor hump.
  • DZoroDZoro Member Posts: 312
    Veto pro bag, love it. Organized tools, handle, and or shoulder strap. I pretty much use only the shoulder strap. Solid, heavy duty, very professional look. Most important it's easy to work out of.
  • Gary SmithGary Smith Member Posts: 151
    I too use and like the veto pro bag, but...it has enough space that I have put way too many heavy tools in it (maybe 40-50 lbs now) and I'm looking for a smaller bag for just a few hand tools too.
  • Stephen MinnichStephen Minnich Member Posts: 2,011
    I have 4 Veto tool bags and/or pouches. Pretty good stuff. I also have 3 Craftsman tool boxes that are 30 years old. Also, pretty good stuff.

  • GBartGBart Member Posts: 397
    Nope but haven't tried the Veto bag, tried everything, buckets, pouches, back packs, plastic boxes that become seats, never found one that I felt was amazing and a keeper.
  • ratioratio Member Posts: 1,529
    When I finally got out of the electrical field, I was down to one of these and an impact. Very nice, all the others I've seen the piece that goes down into your pocket isn't stiff enough & they'll slowly slip out.

    But, I suppose that's not what your looking for. I kinda like the AWP bags you can get from the big box stores, I've had good luck with them not breaking even though I overload them crazily sometimes. I generally try and get a set of tools for each different thing I'm doing, even though it's a lot of duplicates, just so that I don't have to carry everything at once.

  • STEVEusaPASTEVEusaPA Member Posts: 2,044
    I'm still using the bucket for oil burner service. Getting heavy no matter how much I try to keep taking things out.
    A carabiner holds the bucket in place in my van so it doesn't fall over.
    I can sit on the edge of the bucket. And I can throw everything in it to save a trip (not my back) when heading out of the basement.
    If I had to do rooftops, I'd go with a backpack bag
    steve
  • RayWohlfarthRayWohlfarth Member Posts: 430
    Thanks I appreciate the expertise. I will look at the Veto bags @Gary Smith I too have a tendancy of overloading my tool box.
    Ray Wohlfarth
    Boiler Lessons
    Click here to take Ray's class.
    Click here to buy Ray's books.
  • STEAM DOCTORSTEAM DOCTOR Member Posts: 762
    @RayWohlfarth. Had all the issues. Spilling, overloading..... Finally had enough. All tools are in drawers or shelves. Keep empty bucket in truck. Take the tools that I need for particular job. Put them back when I am done. Stays organized and less strain on the old back. I do keep two, small knipex pliers,10 in one screwdriver and knife in cargo pants pockets. Also keep pair of utility gloves and extra thick latex gloves in pants pockets.
  • hot rodhot rod Member Posts: 8,251
    I still keep my aluminum box for the big heavy tools pipe wrenches, tube cutters, small hammer and misc socket and open end wrenches. I can stand on it or cut rod and strut on the top.

    I like a soft back pack for boiler troubleshooting specific tools. You need a selection metric and Torx tools and some speciality tools for mod con work, along with VOM and manometers. Backpacks with individual pockets help keep track of the small hand tools.

    Combustion analyzer in a hard case for best protection.

    Shop around for nice backpack type, you will find a wide selection of shape and sizes. I think Veto private labels those nice bags also, so shop price. Milwaukee has some nice stuff. Eric at Mechanical Hub has good reviews on MKE stuff. Soft, back pack style are nice if you need to travel by air, also.

    Trade shows are the best place to find wide selection all in one place.
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    The magic is in hydronics, and hydronics is in me
  • Stephen MinnichStephen Minnich Member Posts: 2,011
    I keep a small Veto pouch, TP-3, in the cab of my van. I use that on all service diagnosis. For some repairs, I have to pull out the bags.

  • RayWohlfarthRayWohlfarth Member Posts: 430
    Thank you all. I should just have small bag with a limited amount of tools and a shoulder strap. I like @STEAM DOCTOR philosphy. I have a tendancy of overloading my bags LOL.
    Have a great weekend and holiday all
    Ray Wohlfarth
    Boiler Lessons
    Click here to take Ray's class.
    Click here to buy Ray's books.
  • HVACNUTHVACNUT Member Posts: 1,223
    edited June 30
    > @Gary Smith said:
    > I too use and like the veto pro bag, but...it has enough space that I have put way too many heavy tools in it (maybe 40-50 lbs now) and I'm looking for a smaller bag for just a few hand tools too.

    Same.
    I have the Tech MC. Very rarely do I have to go back to the van for a tool that I dont have in the bag. Right after I purchased it Veto Came out with a bag just a couple inches taller, which I could have used. My large adjustable has to sit in the pocket on an angle and the magnet from my Fluke always grabs it when I pull the Fluke out.
    I'm looking for a smaller bag/pouch also for quick service calls.
    For oil, I bring in the Veto bag and a 5 gallon antifreeze bucket with the lid. Slop bucket, rags hand pump, pressure gauge, cleaner, filter wrench, etc. Notch in the lid for a small soot brush to clean F heads. And it makes a good seat.
  • GroundUpGroundUp Member Posts: 161
    I use a bucket with a "Bucket Buddy" sleeve in/on it. Nicely fits all hand tools, and keeps them accessible, but does tend to get pretty heavy when I start throwing hammers, wrenches, fittings, etc in it to avoid an extra trip. I also carry a 12" Husky soft bag with basic hand tools if I know it's only going to be a screwdriver and pliers type job. I tried the backpack thing several times and ended up back with the bucket again
  • JUGHNEJUGHNE Member Posts: 4,387
    40+ years ago starting as a construction electrician only.
    It was the typical side pouch with (get this) a cloth nail apron.
    Then tried the standard carpenter pouch.
    Then back to the electrician pouch balanced by a second one for wirenuts etc.
    Then the Bucket Boss as more service work came along.
    Bucket got too disorganized and heavy.
    Went to a multi pocket square tool bag.
    But then to look more graceful getting up from kneeling in front of a furnace etc, I got a rectangular tool box/bag with a solid pipe handle to use as a crutch. (you will all know what I am talking about......if not already).
    Now I am back to the bucket with a better pocket liner than the first design. More individual compartments.
    And with the padded seat which will do as a kneeling pad in a pinch.
    So the bucket gives the "get up gracefully" crutch and a place to sit.
    But any of the above were getting heavy, not only from adding things and not removing them, but the old shoulders seem reluctant to carry much as time passes. :'(
  • EBEBRATT-EdEBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 3,991
    HAHAHA. I love reading this. Everyone has the same issues. Still looking myself. Never satisfied. When I was younger I carried too much weight. Now I try and travel lighter. But I hate trips to the truck

    Now, I stop and think about what I need and adjust before I go in. Like @ratio I settled on a small AWP bag so it wont be too heavy (I still overload it). I try to stay more organized now. I put things back where they belong, saves searching time.

    I have a Milwaukee backpack for rooftop stuff. Nice for climbing an extension or ships ladder.

    Just as an example I spent 2 days piping a shot feeder. 40' copper propress, hangers, hilti drill, rod nuts fittings battery hacksaw ladder garden hose etc

    Thought about what I needed, loaded it on a cart ad made 1 trip. Worked 2 days, only made 1extra trip to the truck. Very unusual for me.

    I know service is different
  • Stephen MinnichStephen Minnich Member Posts: 2,011
    I have a cart on my truck now too. I roll with 4 times the things I could carry. I wish I would have thought of that a long time ago.

  • RayWohlfarthRayWohlfarth Member Posts: 430
    @EBEBRATT-Ed and @Stephen Minnich Thats so funny. I was just a hospital the other day and the maintenance man uses a wagon. A few years ago I would have teased him now I think. I wish I had thought of that. His wagon even folds.
    Ray Wohlfarth
    Boiler Lessons
    Click here to take Ray's class.
    Click here to buy Ray's books.
  • RayWohlfarthRayWohlfarth Member Posts: 430
    @nicholas bonham-carter I love it Thanks
    Ray Wohlfarth
    Boiler Lessons
    Click here to take Ray's class.
    Click here to buy Ray's books.
  • GroundUpGroundUp Member Posts: 161

    I have a cart on my truck now too. I roll with 4 times the things I could carry. I wish I would have thought of that a long time ago.

    Uh huh. For non-basement jobs I bring a 4 wheel Rubbermaid cart and throw everything on it, which also doubles as a work platform. I'm strictly construction so it usually requires a whole lot of tools and material, the cart saves a ton of time and labor.
  • Stephen MinnichStephen Minnich Member Posts: 2,011
    @GroundUp - We may use the same one? It's rare that a day goes by without using it.


  • lchmblchmb Member Posts: 2,812
    I use a small bag for the basic's.. have a full tool box plus all power tools in their respective box's.. I lose less tools this way and strain on the back is minimal..but I do mostly installs now so..
  • GroundUpGroundUp Member Posts: 161
    @Stephen Minnich yeah it's the same cart, just the wide version. I have one of those narrow ones too but I tend to carry too much crap lol
  • RayWohlfarthRayWohlfarth Member Posts: 430
    Thanks for the ideas
    Ray Wohlfarth
    Boiler Lessons
    Click here to take Ray's class.
    Click here to buy Ray's books.
  • JackmartinJackmartin Member Posts: 87
    edited July 27
    Well for the hell of it ,I looked up how much a Veto Bag costed at 202.00 in the USA would cost in Canada and Mr Trump must have a tariff on those too. A small price of 659.00 before tax for the HVAC bag, ouch,!!! I purchased the complete Rackateers electrical set including braces for 130.00 great quality and easy to get up a ladder. All the best Jack :)
  • RayWohlfarthRayWohlfarth Member Posts: 430
    A friend of mine showed me a wagon he bought from walmart that collapses. It seems to work well and reasonably priced. Is supposed to carry 200 pounds
    Ray Wohlfarth
    Boiler Lessons
    Click here to take Ray's class.
    Click here to buy Ray's books.
  • RayWohlfarthRayWohlfarth Member Posts: 430

    Forgot pic
    Ray Wohlfarth
    Boiler Lessons
    Click here to take Ray's class.
    Click here to buy Ray's books.
  • EBEBRATT-EdEBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 3,991
    @RayWohlfarth
    That's an interesting wagon. I'll have to look it up. Curious as to it's weight and how much room it needs when collapsed. Always a battle to have room in the van!!!
  • Harvey RamerHarvey Ramer Member Posts: 2,135
    I would drive my truck inside someones house to get closer to my work, if that was acceptable!

    What i've been doing for the last few years; a milwaukee back pack (love it) and a few empty buckets in the truck for carry in what I need for the job and collecting waste when the job is done.

    I've been studying on the packout systems, but so far they just haven't suited me.

    What I really want, and have wanted for a long time, is an anti-gravity platform with a knob on it for adjusting the altitude. Great for packing in tools, exactly the right height for a work bench, good for lifting heavy boilers, and throw away your ladders because they are so yesterday :)
    Ramer Mechanical
    ramermechanical.com
    To learn more about this professional, click here to visit their ad in Find A Contractor.
  • RayWohlfarthRayWohlfarth Member Posts: 430
    @EBEBRATT-Ed It folds pretty tight. I bought a wagon from Harbor Freight and it collapsed after 2 uses. Shoulda known
    @Harvey Ramer I love that idea or the ability to lift with my mind
    Ray Wohlfarth
    Boiler Lessons
    Click here to take Ray's class.
    Click here to buy Ray's books.
  • Larry WeingartenLarry Weingarten Member Posts: 1,320
    Hello @Harvey Ramer . I think if you can get your hands on some "Flubber" invented in 1961 by the Absent Minded Professor, your tussle with gravity will come to an end and ladders can become a thing of the distant past. :p

    Yours, Larry
Sign In or Register to comment.

Welcome

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!