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Steam condensate lines ??

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tim smith
tim smith Member Posts: 2,765
edited March 2018 in THE MAIN WALL
Hey all, looking for a vote on whether to repipe condensates under floor in L copper or iron. What is all your opinions. This is against a rat slab under hardwood floors and some under slab in apt bldg. Appreciate any input.
Tim

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  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 15,607
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    If it was my building I prefer black pipe but many use copper with good results as long as it doesn't se any steam.

    Propress & Mega press $$$$$ but are approved for steam (hate that stuff)
  • tim smith
    tim smith Member Posts: 2,765
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    Im not a big fan of press too, longevity is what I am looking for so I do know that iron lasted north of 60 yrs I think, really wonder if copper will live any where near as long.
  • the_donut
    the_donut Member Posts: 374
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    I did a repipe in extra heavy black pipe. Figure it’ll outlast me as the lines replaced were probably from the 40’s. Did another section in 2” iron sleeved 1-1/4” copper. Line ran under concrete outside in 10 below weather so we shoved a copper pipe through to the dirt side in the cellar and dug down there. They both worked fine.

    Just two guys and some map gas. Copper was quicker, but I feel better about the black pipe.
  • nicholas bonham-carter
    nicholas bonham-carter Member Posts: 8,578
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    Would there be any worry about electrolysis between the iron and copper pipe?—NBC
  • tim smith
    tim smith Member Posts: 2,765
    edited March 2018
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    NBC, any time we transition from steel to copper we use brass threaded fittings to help minimize the potential difference.
    Thanks all for the input.
  • nicholas bonham-carter
    nicholas bonham-carter Member Posts: 8,578
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    It’s the copper line sleeved inside the iron pipe I was thinking about.—NBC
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 11,074
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    I see on old building prints that for any steam or return lines under concrete they would call for "to be placed inside tile".
    I assume clay tile which seems to be inert for metal.
  • ratio
    ratio Member Posts: 3,649
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    The condensate return lines at my school (c. 1950's) were in clay drainange tile. Didn't stop them from developing holes. :disappointed: In fact, I had trouble getting them repaired—the plumber "couuldn't find them, all he found was an old drain". Had me scratching my head as well for a few seconds, until I remembered they were encased like that. I ended up having to go over & knock the first hole in it, he didn't want to do it!
    GBart
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 11,074
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    A 1930's school I service had a half basement for the boiler room. The returns came in through the wall about 2' off the floor. When the pipe failed the water poured out of the sleeve.
    A good early indicator, otherwise the water might had undermined the building because of the auto feeder. These were dry returns going to a cond pump BTW.
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 11,074
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    Would CPVC work as a protective sleeve for copper wet returns?
    I see it is rated for 180 degrees at 100 PSI.
  • ratio
    ratio Member Posts: 3,649
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    I woiuld think even PVC would work, as you're not under pressure with the sleeves, or you'd better not be!
    JUGHNE
  • tim smith
    tim smith Member Posts: 2,765
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    Thanks all,
    Tim