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Solving a steam-to-water heat-exchanger problem

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HeatingHelp
HeatingHelp Administrator Posts: 650
edited February 2018 in THE MAIN WALL
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Solving a steam-to-water heat-exchanger problem

Read the full story here


GBart

Comments

  • Jackmartin
    Jackmartin Member Posts: 196
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    So true!!!!
  • RomanP
    RomanP Member Posts: 102
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    I’m doing a lot of work in NYC and dealing with engineers can get to you sometimes. There are great guys that, after having a conversation with you, realize that you have an idea of what you are doing. They’d normally consult or listen to my concern and then amend drawings accordingly. Then there are the ones that want none of it. Thinking they are pencil-pushing gods and you are just a wrench monkey and any communication has to be done through his apprentice, who just got out of school. That’s when I say with ease “ Let’s follow the drawing to a tee”. Because at the end of the day, when “their way” fails down the road, entire responsibility is on their shoulders. Then just let clients lawyers figure out who’s responsible for expensive modifications.
    I really enjoyed this read! Thank you!
  • GBart
    GBart Member Posts: 746
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    Many engineers get in a mind set that everything has to be complicated, there can be no straight lines between 2 points, only zig zags and circles.
  • jumper
    jumper Member Posts: 2,285
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    GBart said:

    Many engineers get in a mind set that everything has to be complicated, there can be no straight lines between 2 points, only zig zags and circles.

    Doesn't that help with thermal expansion?

    On the serious side,engineers often are paid as percentage of project cost. And my experience is that many clients see value in quantity and features. Only really smart folks appreciate simple solutions.
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 11,075
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    This story and also the one about "Install vacuum breaker here" on shell/tube HXG enlightened me to install both on a steam to water exchanger.
    Updated DHW heating for hospital that had steam on line 24/7/365 for nearly 40 years. Added these components to avoid the possibility of tube damage or air lock.
    The articles convinced the in house maint personal it was a good idea. Thanks!
  • bob young
    bob young Member Posts: 2,177
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    would not an F. & T. steam trap not be a better solution. the air should release thru the integral thermostat. what type air vent would one use ? a steam air eliminator would shoot water after the air was released , no ?? we had similar issues with unit heaters. . how about a simplle pip[ing diagram w/ fig. # of components. thanx, bob nyc
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 11,075
    edited March 2018
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    Hopefully this is the right picture.
    I added a G2 vent and a vacuum breaker.
    This HXG does have a set of F&T's in parallel, but it lifts the condensate about 5' to the horizontal drain.

    Don't know for absolute if my additions were needed, but considering the expense of the tube bundle and perhaps the air not passing thru the F&T lift pipe it seemed like a small investment of insurance.

    Note: no water spitting from vent so far.