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Entran 2 has to go - Alternates?

baspen
baspen Member Posts: 1
We are purchasing a home in the mountains of Colorado that has Entran 2. While there have been no signs of problems with the system (since 1992), we have a large remodel planned and want to replace the heating system.
Currently, the basement has a 4" Slab with Entran. The main level has a 3" Concrete Slab (its not lightweight, actual concrete, long story) and has Entran 2. The upper level is staple up Entran.

Our initial thoughts are as follows -
Basement - Baseboard Heat
Main Level - Warmboard R
Upper Level - Staple Up with Aluminum

The real concern is the main floor has tile floor covering and a thick setting bed...it will be a bear to remove. We have some concerns about laying the Warmboard over the concrete unless is perfect, will it "crunch"? Obviously, the cost of the Warmboard R is high. Are there any other proven brands?

Other ideas - in wall radiant? Can we staple up under the 3" of concrete?

Any thoughts or ideas will be appreciated!

Elizabeth



Comments

  • Rich_49
    Rich_49 Member Posts: 2,766
    You could use SunBoard 's Sunfoam panels , 1/2 the cost of WarmBoard R .

    I suggest having a room by room heat loss performed to verify what all areas require beforehand and have a real plan . Staple up is a bad idea with that type of resistance . I also suggest leaving that 3" slab and flooring alone if a heat loss bears out that you can do radiant ceiling .

    You didn't get what you didn't pay for and it will never be what you thought it would .
    Langans Plumbing & Heating LLC
    732-751-1560
    Serving most of New Jersey, Eastern Pa .
    Consultation, Design & Installation anywhere
    Rich McGrath 732-581-3833
  • Zman
    Zman Member Posts: 7,542
    I would do a hybrid system designed for low water temps based on a room by room heat loss.

    Areas like bathrooms and kitchens are very nice with radiant floors. In a carpeted bedroom, radiant floors are barely noticeable. A low profile panel radiator would be a good choice.

    Radiant ceiling and walls are excellent options which are generally under utilized.

    I would strongly suggest you contact @Mark Eatherton. He has a wealth of knowledge and is doing consulting work all over the Colorado Rockies. He is well worth the money, do it right the first time.

    If he does not notice this post, send me a PM and I will put you in contact with him.

    "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough"
    Albert Einstein