Welcome! Here are the website rules, as well as some tips for using this forum.
Need to contact us? Visit https://heatinghelp.com/contact-us/.
Click here to Find a Contractor in your area.

Isolation Valve

Options
cutter
cutter Member Posts: 292
I have bought a couple of webstone isolation valves, they have drains on them. Should the drain be above or below the pump, or does it really matter?
I kind of thought the drains could be used for pumping an additive into the system. Any suggestions on this?

Comments

  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 15,839
    Options
    The drains should be between the pump and the isolation valves
  • mcgee45
    mcgee45 Member Posts: 7
    Options
    Thinking of using this drain passage for adding additives. Did anyone try it yet?
  • Zman
    Zman Member Posts: 7,606
    Options
    I think it depends on your application. I don't think there is a right answer.The drains can be used for draindown, adding chemicals or glycol, pressure testing, you name it.
    "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough"
    Albert Einstein
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 22,476
    Options
    Most pumps have check valves in them now, so if you want to drain the system the valve should be above the pump.

    The integral spring check valve typically hold well enough, by the way, to be used as isolation for changing a motor. With a valve on the suction of course.

    The newest version Webstone can purge from either direction by rotating the main valve handle, very handy.

    Properly placed single purge valve can purge the indirect loop, boiler loop and radiant or connected distribution.

    Placed most anywhere it can be used to inject conditioners.

    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
  • cutter
    cutter Member Posts: 292
    Options

    The drains should be between the pump and the isolation valves

    This valve is not made that way, it has a fixed flange. so I assumed all of them were the same way. I looked at another valve with rotating flanges and that one can drain just the pump or the system. I should have looked at all of them
  • cutter
    cutter Member Posts: 292
    Options
    Zman said:

    I think it depends on your application. I don't think there is a right answer.The drains can be used for draindown, adding chemicals or glycol, pressure testing, you name it.

    Zman, I bought two webstone valves with rotating flanges, those drains make sense. You are able to just drain down the pump or turn the other way and drain down the system. the valve I bought with the fixed flange has the flange then ball valve then drain. I think a better design with the fixed flange would have been flange, drain then ball valve. If I would have looked at all of them I would not have asked this dumb question. And if I knew the rotating flange isolation valve worked the way it does I would have bought all three with rotating flanges. I was thinking it was sort of dumb for buying isolation valves with rotating flanges because the wilo pumps I have bought have rotating flanges. I am thinking differently now. I am planning on adding a chemical when I get this system up and working.
  • cutter
    cutter Member Posts: 292
    Options
    hot rod said:

    Most pumps have check valves in them now, so if you want to drain the system the valve should be above the pump.

    The integral spring check valve typically hold well enough, by the way, to be used as isolation for changing a motor. With a valve on the suction of course.

    The newest version Webstone can purge from either direction by rotating the main valve handle, very handy.

    Properly placed single purge valve can purge the indirect loop, boiler loop and radiant or connected distribution.

    Placed most anywhere it can be used to inject conditioners.

    Hot Rod, I have two pumps like in your 3rd screen shot, ( I did not know that until I looked at the other two ) I will put the drain downstream of the pump. The other one I guess it will not matter where the drain is at.
    That newest version Webstone is what I have on the rotating flange isolation valves I bought. I bought all three isolation valves within a month or so, I would expect all three to be designed the same way, guess not. I would not have looked at the other two valves if you did not post that screen shot of the new version valve. And then I would not have asked this dumb question. I do plan on putting in a conditioner when I get this system up and running, But I can use a purge valve from anywhere. I am hoping to get something like figure 6-14 on page 29 of Idronics 10 built. I do have a 36 hour a day job that interfere's with anything I do.Thanks for your input.
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 22,476
    Options
    Any of the Webstones with that T logo on the handle are multi direction purge including the iso=flange versions.

    There are a confusing number of choices and possibly not all suppliers realize the difference when they are in a bin on the shelves.

    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
  • cutter
    cutter Member Posts: 292
    Options
    Hot Rod, the only place I can buy parts is from supply house. Maybe they wanted to get the ones I got off the self. I think I got the valves with the rotating flanges after that first one. I did not know there was different valves,The open/ close handle is shaped different on the different valves so that should be a dead giveaway on which one to get. I just got educated a little, and some things I can retain and some things I lose. I should retain this.