Click here to Find a Contractor in your area.
Welcome! Here are the website rules, as well as some tips for using this forum.
Need to contact us? Visit https://heatinghelp.com/contact-us/.

Jerry rig broken AC pan drain line holder

D107
D107 Member Posts: 1,726
Noticed the air handler was leaking water, but filter was good and drain line was not blocked. AC guy opened it up and found plastic slot in inside pan had snapped. (Probably stepped on by spray foam contractors.) AC is 25 years old, and is a bit dirty inside--and some black mold that I intend to dab some bleach on tonight, but while deciding on a possible new unit I thought--after it all dries out-- I could superglue the broken piece together, then gorilla tape it from outside and inside pan and see if it will hold. Will also clean the pan bottom. It works fine. Maybe clean coils a bit though they don't have much debris on them, a little rust maybe. Maybe spray some water through the fins and see if there's mucho debris? Any thoughts? See photos.





Comments

  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 15,361
    Well, I'd surely get rid of that mold. You might consider spraying some bleach solution -- around 5 percent perhaps? -- on the coils, too, then rinsing then,

    I've not found super glue to be too helpful on plastic bits but there's no harm to trying. The tape will probably hold -- well enough, anyway.
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England.
    Hoffman Equipped System (all original except boiler), Weil-Mclain 580, 2.75 gph Carlin, Vapourstat 0.5 -- 6.0 ounces per square inch
    D107
  • BobC
    BobC Member Posts: 5,182
    Use super glue (preferably the viscous kind) to immobilize it and when that dries use clear RTV on the outside. You want the clear RTV with the ascetic acid because it holds onto almost anything; white RTV isn't nearly as good for something like this.

    Bob
    Smith G8-3 with EZ Gas @ 90,000 BTU, Single pipe steam
    Vaporstat with a 12oz cut-out and 4oz cut-in
    3PSI gauge
    D107
  • Larry Weingarten
    Larry Weingarten Member Posts: 2,083
    Hello, There are some epoxies made for plastic. They form a thin paste that might work nicely here if you clean and sand the mating surfaces. Here's one: http://www.midlandhardware.com/163486.html?utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=**LP - Shop - Adhesives&utm_term=4575686358611614&utm_content=163486 | J-B Plastic Weld Epoxy 25 ML 50132 | $4.02

    Yours, Larry
    D107
  • D107
    D107 Member Posts: 1,726
    Great suggestions thanks. I also heard of this powdered epoxy for drain pans, but having to mix it up would make it a bit cumbersome I think: https://www.walmart.com/ip/Pan-Patch-Drain-Pan-Sealant/37891972 Also I guess Super Glue is better than Gorilla Glue, which I happen to have. Someone also suggested using the other drain port after raising the height of the damaged area, but then I'd have to jerry rig some new plastic drainage piping to match up to the rest of it.
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 8,525
    if your patch doesn't hold you could probably put an auxiliary drain pan under it
    D107
  • D107
    D107 Member Posts: 1,726
    edited June 2017
    There is already an second larger drain pan--perhaps not visible in photos--underneath the handler that has its own drain line that joins up with the primary drain line but that one has no trap and unfortunately whoever installed this years ago has the drain line threading right into the top of the plumbing stack: sewer gases.

    Also I am concerned that the mold is in the path of the air going out through the handler to the trunk, the feeds, then metal ducts to the room registers. Should I have all this checked and/or cleaned before I use the AC again? Seems like AC pans will always be wet as they drain out--how is mold prevented?
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 11,491
    edited June 2017
    Clean the entire thing well with very and see how it goes.
    In the winter when it dries out completely you could give it another cleaning.

    A UV light is an option to killing growing things that love evaporators and pans.

    As an example :

    http://www.supplyhouse.com/Trion-UV360-1-ComfortBreeze-High-Efficiency-High-Output-UV-C-Lamp-Air-Cleaner-System


    Here's a brochure on it.

    http://s3.supplyhouse.com/product_files/Trion-UV360-1-Product-Overview.pdf

    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
    D107
  • D107
    D107 Member Posts: 1,726
    @ChrisJ Thanks! I cleaned off the mold today but noticed that part of the problem--undiagnosed on various service calls through the years––is that the pitch of the unit is not quite right--it pitches down on one side awa from the drain port, so a bit of water will always be in there. Since the unit is sitting on two two-by-fours in the outer pan, I might be able to shim it up slightly. You left out a word in your first sentence. 'clean the entire thing well with very __________?
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 11,491
    David107 said:

    @ChrisJ Thanks! I cleaned off the mold today but noticed that part of the problem--undiagnosed on various service calls through the years––is that the pitch of the unit is not quite right--it pitches down on one side awa from the drain port, so a bit of water will always be in there. Since the unit is sitting on two two-by-fours in the outer pan, I might be able to shim it up slightly. You left out a word in your first sentence. 'clean the entire thing well with very __________?

    I was going to say diluted mixture of water and chlorine.
    The problem is, I still don't know how safe even weak chlorine is to use near or on an evaporator.

    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • D107
    D107 Member Posts: 1,726
    edited June 2017
    This post talks about putting a swimming pool chlorine tablet in the evaporator pan and also using bleach to flush the evaporator tube.
    https://www.thisoldhouse.com/ideas/air-conditioners-really-are-getting-better
  • Mike
    Mike Member Posts: 94
    I've had good results, sealing cracked pans, with roofing repair tape. Temporary repairs, although some are still holding from several years ago. You'll need to somehow clamp the drain fitting in place. But seriously, 25 years, time to replace.
    D107
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 11,491
    If you can hold off another 3-5 years I would
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • D107
    D107 Member Posts: 1,726
    edited June 2017
    Saw a guy on youtube put crazy glue on a plastic crack then put baking soda over it while it cured, made it solid like a rock. Talks a bit on the intro but results are good.
  • TheKeymaster
    TheKeymaster Member Posts: 37
    edited June 2017
    http://www.homedepot.com/p/J-B-Weld-Waterweld-8277/202528473

    I've used this and similar products. JB water weld. I had a hot tub drain leaking once that couldn't be reached but with one hand. A huge project to cut framing to replace a trap and some pvc. I made a snake out of this stuff and wrapped it around the pipe. Then just squeezed it and smashed it all around pipe flat. It gets hard as rock. Lived there 7 years longer and it never leaked. Plus you can sand it if you need too. I'd put that stuff all on the outside because you can build it out more. Even wrap it up and over the drain tube because once it gets hard it will be like an added brace. Then on the inside seam just put a little silicone to keep the water out of the seem.

    I keep a stick of this in my car as emergency item. Pro tip: mix it good but use gloves. You are basically kneading it into your hands if you mix it enough. Didn't have the easiest time getting it off my hands on my first use of it. haha

    *edit. I might even drill a few holes like 3/8" on the edges up a little higher where water probably doesn't go. That way you can jam it through the holes and then flatten the otherside out like stove bolt. Probably be stronger then original.
    D107
  • MilanD
    MilanD Member Posts: 1,159
    edited June 2017
    FWIF, I used this thing* on the pan crack, exact spot like yours on the drain, except not all the way broken off, plus a horizontal crack off on the flat pan surface, under the coil. It kept pan from leaking a few years. When it started again, cleaned and redid again.

    * https://www.geocelusa.com/product/geocel-4500-roof-bonding-sealant/

    * any good roofing supply company will have these in stock.
    D107
Sign In or Register to comment.

Welcome

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!