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gas pipe grounding

Dan467Dan467 Posts: 6
csst tubing needs a ground in many cases why does a flex connector not?

Comments

  • IronmanIronman Posts: 3,281
    Technically, any metallic gas line has to be grounded. The ground connection should be as close to, or before, the point of entry to the structure. Therefore, a flex connector is grounded by its connection to the gas supply piping.
    Bob Boan







    You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.
  • JUGHNEJUGHNE Posts: 2,857
    A flex connector is limited in factory lengths so would not snake all around the house like CSST. I believe the flex connector is of thicker material as it has to be flexed for appliance slide in and out.

    The solid grounding of CSST became necessary because a lighting strike could enter the gas piping and jump out of the CSST over to a water line or any good grounded item. This would sometimes put a pinhole in the tubing and the energy from the strike would light the gas. Sometimes just looking like a standing pilot on your gas line, more often a catastrophic ending. I have heard of it happening on soft copper also. The CSST people claims it can happen to black iron pipe also......???
  • IronmanIronman Posts: 3,281
    edited May 18
    Tim McElwain can chime in, but he's stated that he's seen it happen to black iron too.
    Bob Boan







    You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.
  • Dan467Dan467 Posts: 6
    Is there a code that says a gas pipe other then csst has to be grounded?
  • IronmanIronman Posts: 3,281
    It's in the NEC section 250.
    Bob Boan







    You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.
  • lchmblchmb Posts: 2,467
    I believe the theory is the ground on the appliance will protect the appliance connector
  • Dan467Dan467 Posts: 6
    ironman was write on with el code 44 years in trade no one does it
  • HenryHenry Posts: 663
    In Canada it is in the electrical code. After a long battle the AHJ has decided that the pipefitter must supply and install the ground clamp on the piping near the point of entry into the building. The electrician must then ground the pipe.
  • ChrisJChrisJ Posts: 8,026
    edited May 18
    Dan467 said:

    ironman was write on with el code 44 years in trade no one does it

    I did it in my home, but could never get a straight answer of whether or not it was appropriate with black iron.

    I left it, because in my mind, it seemed correct to have it bonded.

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  • JUGHNEJUGHNE Posts: 2,857
    The most grounding an iron pipe gas line might get is by virtue of being screwed into the furnace gas valve. You might have the furnace homerun with #14 or #12 ground wire but it is connected to maybe a #14 bonded to the furnace itself.
    One of my AHJ said that gas pipe should be bonded to the electrical system with a wire size that could carry the capacity of the circuit that could potentially energize the pipe. So if a 60amp range circuit was in the area he figured something that could flow 60 amps to trip that CB. I believe #10 ground wire would do that.
    Also somewhere in the code ductwork is included and jumpers across any flex connectors that might be in rectangular ducts.
    This would include HW heating copper also, though it is usually screwed into a boiler. (grounded only as well as the FAF mentioned above.)
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