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Pipe expansion noise at ceiling

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NFER
NFER Member Posts: 32
After solving the expansion noise at the radiator support, I need your help guys to fix other problem.
I have also expansion noise at one steam pipe at the ceiling of my bedroom.
Attached is a picture. It is a continuous and very annoying noise of the pipe pushing something. First I thought the pipe was pushing the cap but I tried to have a gap between the pipe and the cap and the noise became louder.
Then I added pieces of plastic milk jug around the pipe to avoid any contact, but I still have the same noise.
So I don't really know where the origin of the noise is.
Can you help me guys?
I am think of using high heat silicone to seal the gap but I am not sure this is going to help.


Comments

  • STEVEusaPA
    STEVEusaPA Member Posts: 6,505
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    Can you get up above it to better diagnose? Could be rubbing something a little higher.

    There was an error rendering this rich post.

  • Fred
    Fred Member Posts: 8,542
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    What's above the ceiling? An attic or an apartment/finished room? In all likelihood the pipe is rubbing against the old wood lathe strips or some other wood flooring/structure. Exactly where does that riser go?
  • NFER
    NFER Member Posts: 32
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    it goes to an apartment.
    So I only have access from below.
    I could try tonight to use longer pieces of plastic milk.
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,565
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    How tall is the building, and what floor are you on?
    Retired and loving it.
  • NFER
    NFER Member Posts: 32
    edited March 2017
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    4 stories and I am on the 2nd floor. But there is a transition of the pipes below my apartment floor, so that raiser starts from my apartment.
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,565
    edited March 2017
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    Back in the day, they would anchor a steam riser in the center of the building so that it expanded both ways and didn't cause the problem you're having. That's what that plate on your ceiling is for. There should be a matching plate on the floor of the apartment above you and both should be holding the pipe in place. My guess is that the other plate is gone, or if it's still there, the two are no longer working together to clamp the riser in place.

    Another reason they clamped the riser was to keep it from expanding upward only because that could tilt a one-pipe radiator and keep the condensate from draining. That creates water hammer and spitting air vents.
    Retired and loving it.
    Bob Bona_4
  • NFER
    NFER Member Posts: 32
    edited March 2017
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    So how can I fix it from the apartment below?
    to recreate the anchor, can I seal it with silicone trying to tight the cap and the raiser together?
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,565
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    I don't think silicone would stop the pipe from moving. The plates they used in the old days actually screwed or clamped to the pipe to anchor it to the ceiling/floor of the center of the building. Perhaps show all of this to your landlord?

    Ah, the joys of apartment living!
    Retired and loving it.
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 23,635
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    @Dan Holohan is probably right -- he usually is. Which presents a problem: if the noise is coming from movement there, the only really good way to stop it is to stop the movement. Silicone -- or some other sealant -- isn't going to do it. Can you examine the fitting carefully -- very carefully -- to see if and how it was anchored to the pipe originally? And can you also examine the bottom of that riser, to see if anything is restricting the movement of the pipe there? Obviously you can't examine the top to see if it is restricted there! But if something is restricting the movement at the bottom, that would make the pipe move upwards through that fitting...

    Just speculating.
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
  • NFER
    NFER Member Posts: 32
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    Can loctite restrain the movement?
    it could work as a weld
    loctiteproducts.com/p/epxy_weld_t/overview/Loctite-Epoxy-Weld-Bonding-Compound.htm
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,565
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    Are the people above you having the same complaint about the noise? Will they let you look at the riser from their perspective?

    Are you in NYC?
    Retired and loving it.
  • NFER
    NFER Member Posts: 32
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    yes I am in NYC. I don't get along with my neighbor
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,565
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    Okay. Can the landlord help?
    Retired and loving it.
  • NFER
    NFER Member Posts: 32
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    he is not very proactive
  • Fred
    Fred Member Posts: 8,542
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    If you can't stop it from moving, I would think the next best thing is to try and work a plastic sleeve around it so that it slides. If you can do that from your side, you may be able to slide it up enough to go up through the flooring above you. I'd say a 12", 14" sleeve, thickness of milk carton material. Of course if there is a clamp of some type on that pipe, the sleeve won't slide up there.
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,565
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    Could lead to a burning-plastic smell.
    Retired and loving it.
  • Fred
    Fred Member Posts: 8,542
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    Looks like an insulated pipe.
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,565
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    Is it? NYC has a lot of bare pipe in bathrooms and kitchens that act as radiators. Tough to tell.
    Retired and loving it.
  • NFER
    NFER Member Posts: 32
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    Fixed. I inserted a longer plastic sleeve and now it is running smoothly.
    And no plastic smell.
    Thanks!
    MilanD
  • Fred
    Fred Member Posts: 8,542
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    Good for you! Enjoy the silence.
  • RJ_4
    RJ_4 Member Posts: 484
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    riser clamp

    There was an error rendering this rich post.

  • MilanD
    MilanD Member Posts: 1,160
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    Plastic bottles cut to wrap around pipes are a miracle.
  • Koan
    Koan Member Posts: 439
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    @MilanD no melting issues??
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 23,635
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    Koan said:

    @MilanD no melting issues??

    Some plastics do melt -- but the plastic from which those gallon milk bottles is made doesn't. Great stuff for the purpose!

    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
    SeanBeans
  • MilanD
    MilanD Member Posts: 1,160
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    @Koan

    Used plastic from a small bleach bottle for a horizontal hot water main going through an I beam. No more clicking. 170*F max temp.
  • Fred
    Fred Member Posts: 8,542
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    I think the milk container is rated at 250*F
    MilanDKoan
  • Koan
    Koan Member Posts: 439
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    excellent!
  • Paul48
    Paul48 Member Posts: 4,469
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    I work on injection molding machines. All plastics have different melting points. Most that you would see around the house are higher than the temperature generated for residential heating.
    Koan