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Vapor System Radiator control valve

Anyone have a suggestion for a replacement valve?
The existing one is all stuck, and stops are all messed up.

Comments

  • Steamhead
    Steamhead Member Posts: 15,755
    That looks like it was made by Barnes & Jones. They're still in business- maybe @Sailah , who works there, would know if it can be rebuilt?
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    Towson, MD, USA
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Consulting
  • nicholas bonham-carter
    nicholas bonham-carter Member Posts: 8,572
    Even if it cannot turn, it may be open enough to pass some steam into the rad. Do you see any signs of this, and have you checked the trap operation?
    Popping the lid on the trap would enable you to see the amount of steam which is entering the radiator, although you must have someone available at the boiler to quickly shut it off.--NBC
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 20,432
    Work on it. It probably hasn't been turned in ages -- perhaps ever. It may be possible to free it up. Take it a little at a time, trying to turn it both ways. Don't be afraid of it (but don't put a wrench on it, either!) -- it will take a full two handed torque without damage. Don't try a lubricant, though -- that will cause more problems than you want to have. If it doesn't free up, do ask @Sailah about it. The last resort would be to try to replace it, since that means also replacing the spud in the radiator, and that is a pain in the neck.
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
  • Sailah
    Sailah Member Posts: 826
    Unfortunately we don't have rebuild kits for radiator valves. Too bad those are good looking valves.
    Peter Owens
    SteamIQ
  • Steamhead
    Steamhead Member Posts: 15,755
    Maybe Tunstall can supply a rebuild kit.
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    Towson, MD, USA
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Consulting
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 20,432
    I still think it's worth trying to see if it can be freed up. I've had a few (Hoffmans) which I thought were stuck beyond recall, but with time and patience I got them going again. I'll grant you that I've resorted a couple of times to a 12" slip joint wrench with rubber jaws (to protect the finish)...
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
  • BILLHVAC
    BILLHVAC Member Posts: 3
    Thanks guys. I think I'll roll up my sleeves, take it apart and see what I can do.
  • Koan
    Koan Member Posts: 436
    @Steamhead
    "Maybe Tunstall can supply a rebuild kit." I called them for my Hoffman number 7 valves - no joy.
  • Steamhead
    Steamhead Member Posts: 15,755
    Sometimes you have to send them a valve so they can put a kit together.
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    Towson, MD, USA
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Consulting
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 10,279
    I had a similar issue with old regulating valves.
    If it is stuck in an overheating position and not leaking, you could put an orifice in the union fitting between the radiator.
    Start with very small opening and drill larger to where the heat is adequate for you to be comfortable.
    MilanDGrallert
  • Gordo
    Gordo Member Posts: 826
    edited January 2017
    @Koan: Tunstall could not help you with your Hoffman #7 valves? Oh, say it ain't so!

    Did they tell you they stopped making their rebuild kit for that valve?

    They used to have two types. They only had one version until I sent them another (older circa 1925) version and they made a kit for it.

    True, in order to use the Tunstall rebuild kit, you removed totally the guts of the valve and the result does not have, sad to say, the early twentieth century Art Deco charm of the original.

    Provided the spline was not sheared off by over-wrenching (easy to do, unfortunately), the 1934 version of the valve can be repaired to full functionality.

    The 1925 version of the valve has a few more issues to overcome, but is do-able.

    The 1918 version... well, still working on that one.


    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    "Reducing our country's energy consumption, one system at a time"
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Baltimore, MD (USA) and consulting anywhere.
    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/all-steamed-up-inc
  • Koan
    Koan Member Posts: 436
    @Gordo, @Steamhead I was hoping to find a replacement "JENKINS DISC" (see image002).

    I can forward what they sent to me. I was interested in keeping the original appearance, so maybe I misspoke. I love the authentic look, and was thinking I would rather polish them and have them wide open than have them functional and look different. - anyway here is what they told me:

    "Kelly,
    Thank you for your email. Unfortunately, we cannot rebuild the existing valve and make it look new. The only thing we can do with this valve is repair it and turn it into an on/off valve or a thermostatic valve by using one of our conversion kits.
    I have attached three pictures of what we offer."




    Gordo - anything you guys have in mind I'd love to try it! Not sure which version I have but from the date of the house I would guess 1925. Anxious to get your opinion!
  • Gordo
    Gordo Member Posts: 826
    @Koan : Did you see the YouTube video on rebuilding the Hoffman #7 valve? Was that in any way helpful?
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    "Reducing our country's energy consumption, one system at a time"
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Baltimore, MD (USA) and consulting anywhere.
    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/all-steamed-up-inc
    Koanvaporvac
  • Koan
    Koan Member Posts: 436
    @Gordo ...I didn't know of that video!!! Sounds like exactly for what I am looking! I'll do a search , but might come back here and ask if I can't find it. Thank you for letting me know it exists!!!
    Gordo
  • Koan
    Koan Member Posts: 436
    @Jim_R Good thinking....as much as I am pleased with the paint I feel the radiators still look very original. Not sire though how theses may have been painted originally. They are now hi- gloss and the refinisher said that is the only paint he would stand behind. Maybe I'm going in the "resto-mod" direction. I have cleaned up all the trap tops. I will possibly remove the valves and traps, buff them, hi temp lacquer and reassemble if I have time. For now I was happy to get the paint off them. The trap covers are nickel plated brass...in a few places the plating is starting to wear through, but I'll only go so far. For at least a few of these I would love to polish them up... If I have the time !
  • Koan
    Koan Member Posts: 436
    @Gordo ... Found it!!!!

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=9NbHvUsaIZc

    Will be working on them once spring comes! Thank you.

    Can I get the plastic handles from you guys???
    Do you have any extra valves ? I am one or two short.
    Gordo
  • Paul_11
    Paul_11 Member Posts: 210
    You can buy a Mepco TRV with a built in orifice that is a great replacement for your radiator valve.

    I install lots of these MEPCO orifice valves on two pipe steam systems and they work great.

    Since 1990, I have made steam systems quiet, comfortable, and efficient. We provide comfort while saving the planet.
    NYC RETROFIT ACCELERATOR QUALIFIED SERVICE PROVIDER

    A REAL GOOD PLUMBER, INC
    NYC LMP: 1307
    O:212-505-1837
    M:917-939-0593
  • Koan
    Koan Member Posts: 436
    @Paul thanks I'll take a look... havent explored TRVs.