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Trap Identification Inquiry

On my 2 pipe system in my home, I have 2 traps(?) at floor level on each return line. They are ID'ed as Airbanks with a triangle on top fitting with an F in the triangle and a patent date of Nov 10 1925 on top fitting also. What are these and how should they be maintained? Also have what I think is a bucket type trap with Walworth name near one of these. What is this and how should i maintain it?
Would appreciate any info .

Comments

  • Sailah
    Sailah Member Posts: 826
    Wondering if they are Fairbanks? See if any of this looks familiar most of them look like this.

    Post pics if you can with details on pipe size, dimensions etc. I have all the drawings just need more info.

    Any chance you could send me one that way I can be sure.

    It's a very uncommon trap that I can tell you.
    Peter Owens
    SteamIQ
  • furnacefigher15
    furnacefigher15 Member Posts: 514
    What you describe sounds like a run of mill thermostic trap aka radiator trap. When used in conjuction with a bucket trap in paralell, the combo acts the same way as a Float and thermostatic trap, which serves both functions in a single trap. The thermostatic trap does a good job at allowing air to escape, but wont handle the condensate as fast as a bucket trap.

    As far as maintenance goes, the thermostatic trap has a element inside that is replaceable - or was at one time - if you suspect its not working, Id replace it. You should here it click open and closed every couple minutes when the boiler runs, and the outlet should be cooler then the inlet, but not cold.

    The bucket trap may last a lifetime, especially in a smaller system. Probably are not any replacement parts available for that at this point of its from the 30's but if its a brand thats still around there might be.
  • richarddowling
    richarddowling Member Posts: 28
    Guys,
    Thanks for info. Pls see posted pics on what I described above. These are at far end of my heating system on condensate return lines. Any idea what they are?
    Pic trap1 is a Fairbanks fed by 1 inch pipe with 1 inch outlet.
    Pic trap 2 is fed by 1.25 inch pipe with 1.25 inch outlet. These are both at floor level.

  • Sailah
    Sailah Member Posts: 826
    I'll check my drawing file on Tuesday
    Peter Owens
    SteamIQ
  • SWEI
    SWEI Member Posts: 7,356
    edited January 2017
    Any chance those are swing checks?
  • Steamhead
    Steamhead Member Posts: 14,476
    SWEI said:

    Any chance those are swing checks?

    I think you're right. The second one definitely is. The first one might be a lift-type check.
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Consulting
  • richarddowling
    richarddowling Member Posts: 28
    What is function of a swing or lift check, and can I do any PM on them?
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 9,018
    a check valve only allows the flow of water, steam, condensate (whatever is in the pipe) to flow in one direction only. They may or may not have an arrow on them. they prevent flow in the opposite direction (hence, "check valve")

    I would not disturb them UNLESS some system operating malfunction points to the check valve not working.

    They can be dissembled and cleaned, if accessable . However if a 1" valve malfunctioned you may be better off to replace it.

    Looking at your pictures it looks like the flow on the lower picture goes from left to right (flow coming out of the 90 deg elbow) The upper picture I can't tell.
  • richarddowling
    richarddowling Member Posts: 28
    Thanks Ed. It does flow left to right. I'm not really having an issue with system other than 1 cold radiator I've tried everything on: pitch, new valve, new trap. I can hear steam in feed pipe, pipe is hot, but it never seems to travel into radiator. next I think i'll blow out radiator with compressed air in case its clogged somewhere? Any other suggestions? It's at far end of feed line on 2nd floor.
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 9,018
    Why not post some pictures of the offending radiator and the piping? One pipe, two pipe. Also check pitch on piping. Are you running any pressure at the boiler?

    Just be careful with how much pressure you put on the old radiator I would be careful with that idea
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 15,858

    Thanks Ed. It does flow left to right. I'm not really having an issue with system other than 1 cold radiator I've tried everything on: pitch, new valve, new trap. I can hear steam in feed pipe, pipe is hot, but it never seems to travel into radiator. next I think i'll blow out radiator with compressed air in case its clogged somewhere? Any other suggestions? It's at far end of feed line on 2nd floor.

    Trap? Sounds like two pipe. Check the pitch on both the feed and the return pipe. Make sure that the return pipe drains freely to the dry return. Make sure that the return pipe goes into a dry return, not a wet return, and that the dry return is vented. If the air can't get out -- which it does through the return on two pipe systems -- the steam can't get in.

    I suppose a radiator could clog, but I surely don't see how. I wouldn't put compressed air onto it, anyway. If the inlet and outlet are clear, that's about it.

    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
  • richarddowling
    richarddowling Member Posts: 28
    It is 2 pipe. I'll check pitch again on return. I'm running about 1 pound of pressure which as I understand should be the norm from what I read in Dan's books. I'll scratch the blowout idea for radiator. Dry return is vented and main vent is working. Stay tuned.
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