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Snow melt

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Paul S_3
Paul S_3 Member Posts: 1,261
What is the best insulation for this application? What kind have you guys used in the past with good results? Thanks Paul S
ASM Mechanical Company
Located in Staten Island NY
Servicing all 5 boroughs of NYC.
347-692-4777
ASMMECHANICALCORP@GMAIL.COM
ASMHVACNYC.COM
https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/asm-mechanical-company

Comments

  • Tinman
    Tinman Member Posts: 2,808
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    1" extruded polystyrene at least. 2" XPS ideally -> Foamular 250
    Steve Minnich
    Paul S_3SWEI
  • EzzyT
    EzzyT Member Posts: 1,297
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    Barrier X5 insulation and vapor barrier all in one
    E-Travis Mechanical LLC
    Etravismechanical@gmail.com
    201-887-8856
    Tinmanjonny88Paul S_3
  • jonny88
    jonny88 Member Posts: 1,139
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    Dont forget to insulate the perimeter also....2 inch styrofoam but confirm with Ezzy or Stephen.Good luck with it.
    Paul S_3
  • Zman
    Zman Member Posts: 7,607
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    I just took a quick look at the X5 product.
    If you are looking for a product that is easy to install and you only need an R value of 5.3, it looks like it would do the trick.
    With a low R value and 12-15 psi rating, it does not look like a good fit for snowmelt systems that see vehicle traffic.


    www.2hsc.com/data/uploads/nofp/nofpbarrierflyerx532508-productsheet.pdf
    "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough"
    Albert Einstein
    Paul S_3
  • Solid_Fuel_Man
    Solid_Fuel_Man Member Posts: 2,646
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    What is up with a dislike for all the comments?

    Taylor
    Serving Northern Maine HVAC & Controls. I burn wood, it smells good!
  • Paul S_3
    Paul S_3 Member Posts: 1,261
    edited November 2016
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    I guess i have fat fingers....i fixed it
    ASM Mechanical Company
    Located in Staten Island NY
    Servicing all 5 boroughs of NYC.
    347-692-4777
    ASMMECHANICALCORP@GMAIL.COM
    ASMHVACNYC.COM
    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/asm-mechanical-company
  • delta T
    delta T Member Posts: 884
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    I think "Thank" turned into "Dislike"

    @Erin Holohan Haskell
  • Paul S_3
    Paul S_3 Member Posts: 1,261
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    yes it did....
    ASM Mechanical Company
    Located in Staten Island NY
    Servicing all 5 boroughs of NYC.
    347-692-4777
    ASMMECHANICALCORP@GMAIL.COM
    ASMHVACNYC.COM
    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/asm-mechanical-company
  • Solid_Fuel_Man
    Solid_Fuel_Man Member Posts: 2,646
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    Ah, that's better, I was worried...
    Serving Northern Maine HVAC & Controls. I burn wood, it smells good!
  • Erin Holohan Haskell
    Erin Holohan Haskell Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 2,347
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    delta T said:

    I think "Thank" turned into "Dislike"

    @Erin Holohan Haskell

    Thanks for letting me know. Our developers at Vanilla re-purposed the Dislike button to create a Thanks button for us. A recent update may have messed with the settings. I've disabled it for now and will look into it.

    President
    HeatingHelp.com

  • Paul S_3
    Paul S_3 Member Posts: 1,261
    edited November 2016
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    Another question guys or @Mark Eatherton ..... im using a couple condensing boilers here .... question is should i be mixing to the slab preferably or straight pipe it like in the pic above since im using condensing boilers (Instead of 1 boiler there will be 2...and a buffer in place of the closely spaced tees)
    ASM Mechanical Company
    Located in Staten Island NY
    Servicing all 5 boroughs of NYC.
    347-692-4777
    ASMMECHANICALCORP@GMAIL.COM
    ASMHVACNYC.COM
    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/asm-mechanical-company
  • SWEI
    SWEI Member Posts: 7,356
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    No need for mixing if these are supplying only the snowmelt.
    Tinman
  • Mark Eatherton
    Mark Eatherton Member Posts: 5,853
    edited November 2016
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    Paul S said:


    Another question guys or @Mark Eatherton ..... im using a couple condensing boilers here .... question is should i be mixing to the slab preferably or straight pipe it like in the pic above since im using condensing boilers (Instead of 1 boiler there will be 2...and a buffer in place of the closely spaced tees)

    I agree with Kurt. Straight in and out. No mix needed and your boiler will be as efficient as it can be. I also agree with Zman that 15 psi density is borderline for vehicular traffic.

    Also, skip the buffer. Not needed, really won't do any good unless you are micro zoning or something like that..

    ME

    There was an error rendering this rich post.

  • Paul S_3
    Paul S_3 Member Posts: 1,261
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    @Mark Eatherton , @Zman or @SWEI what would be the most ideal under slab insulation?
    ASM Mechanical Company
    Located in Staten Island NY
    Servicing all 5 boroughs of NYC.
    347-692-4777
    ASMMECHANICALCORP@GMAIL.COM
    ASMHVACNYC.COM
    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/asm-mechanical-company
  • Zman
    Zman Member Posts: 7,607
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    For most applications you would be looking for a closed cell insulation board with a 25 PSI rating. Dow blue board and Owens Corning foamular 250 are common ones.
    On jobs with pavers and vehicles, consider going with higher rated product. Concrete does not flex very much so the weight is distributed over a wide area. With pavers, they can move independently, this will focus the weigh on a small area of foam.

    I agree that no mixing is needed with condensing boilers. Buffer tanks are also not needed with such a large load.

    I would do primary secondary even if you flow rates are similar. When the system comes up from a cold start, the glycol in the tubes will move very slowly. The boiler will be happier if it has steady flow.
    "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough"
    Albert Einstein
    Solid_Fuel_Man
  • Mark Eatherton
    Mark Eatherton Member Posts: 5,853
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    The difference is XPS versus EPS. EPS is the white styrofoam that your coffee cups are made of. XPS is extruded and much more robust. It comes in green, pink, and blue and as previously noted also comes in different densities per square inch.

    ME

    There was an error rendering this rich post.