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Weil McLain Gold GV Series 3 Not Firing

Kenwood850Kenwood850 Posts: 3Member
I have a Weil McLain Gold GV Series 3 boiler with a Weil McLain model 1013-200 controller. When it attempts to fire all the lights turn on in sequence except the flame light. After several start cycles the controller gives up and the power and flame light flash.

At first blush I thought it was either the ignitor or the gas valve that was malfunctioning and this is what I have found so far.


Gas Valve:

24V present at the valve
Coil resistance - 98 ohms
The solenoid clicks at the appropriate time in the firing sequence
The smell of gas increases dramatically at the outside vent pipe at the time the valve is supposed to open,


Hot Surface Ignitor:

120V present at the hot surface ignitor at the appropriate time
Ignitor resistance - 95 ohms
Ignitor glows red during the sequence when removed from the boiler.


As far as the sequence of events, this is what I have found.

15 seconds after the pressure switch light turns on, 120 V is applied to the ignitor.
20 seconds after voltage is applied to the ignitor, 24V is applied to the gas valve
2 seconds after voltage is applied to the gas valve, the ignitor turns off – 0V
5 seconds after the ignitor is turned off, the gas valve closes – 0V


All indications are that the ignitor and gas valve are working properly but what I cannot determine is if the gas valve is opening fully and I do not have the experience to know if the ignitor is hot enough based on the amount of red color I an seeing. I also do not have the experience to know if the 2 second overlap when both the ignitor and gas valve are energized is sufficient. It seems rather short to me but I have read in other postings that this short of an overlap is normal wondering where to look next.

Probably the least expensive thing to try is a new ignitor despite what I am seeing.

Thoughts anyone?

P.S. If this a repeat, my apologies. I thought I hit "Post Discussion" over 7 hours ago for a similar message but I do not see it on the site but I do see it in my draft folder. The logical conclusion is that I hit "Save Draft" rather than "Post Discussion" but if that is not the case, perhaps a moderator can delete one of the posts.

Comments

  • Tim McElwainTim McElwain Posts: 4,279Member
    If you have the manual for the boiler look at Chart 5 in the Troubleshooting section.

    Are all the valves in the on position?

    Check connections to the gs valve make sure they are tight.

    Recycle boiler after leaving off for 45 seconds.

    If you have 24 volts across the valve terminals then replace the igniter. If no 24 volts across the gas valve replace the control module (1013-200).

    If after replacing the igniter you still have a problem you may need to replace the gas valve.
  • Kenwood850Kenwood850 Posts: 3Member
    Thanks.
    Even though the posting date says Aug 2, I posted on weekend (July 30 or 31) and ended replacing the ignitor as it was the cheapest of the two (gas valve or ignitor) on Monday without waiting for a response. We had already been without hot water since Friday evening and so I kept my fingers crossed and went for it.

    Even though the old one seemed to test fine and got hot enough to glow it apparently was not hot enough. The new one
    was the cure.

    Thanks for getting back to me and you definitely had the right answer.

    As an aside, you used "igniter" and I used "ignitor". When I writing up my post I looked at what others were using and consulted "onelook.com" and the latter indicated that either one was acceptable so I flipped a coin.
  • Tim McElwainTim McElwain Posts: 4,279Member
    It is spelled both ways. The problem with the igniter had nothing to do with getting hot enough. The igniter once it lights the burner then becomes a sensor, sensing the flame and producing a microamp signal which tells the electronics it is safe to light off and stay lit. That was what was wrong with your system. Good luck!
  • Kenwood850Kenwood850 Posts: 3Member
    Thanks for the explanation, I was not aware of it being a sensor as well. Thanks again
  • Charlie from wmassCharlie from wmass Posts: 4,090Member
    Thanks Tim I have often wondered why blowing igniters on those Weil Mclain golds, responded well to being replaced with a new ignitor. As a side note apparently my voice to text Will spell it either way also.
    Cost is what you spend , value is what you get.

    cell # 413-841-6726
    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/charles-garrity-plumbing-and-heating
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