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Pump condensation

PaulWojnicki
PaulWojnicki Member Posts: 17
I want to circulate, as low as 40 degree antifreeze. The pump company says the ambient temperature of were the pump is located has to be below the fluid temp. or condensation will form inside the pump. Any body know how to deal with this situation. Like is there a low temp. pump and what brand? Or could I wrap the pump in plastic?

Comments

  • aircooled81
    aircooled81 Member Posts: 197
    Air tight, buy some armaflex, watch a you tube video.
    Armaflex comes in sheets of 3/8, 1/2" 3/4" thick.
    Wrap the valute (usually in a box shape) with armaflex, glue the edges together. Do it while the pump is dry.
    As long as air does not circulate, condensate cant form.
    I agree with hatterasguy, they ment condensate on the outside.
    He is correct about the rh%, but i can't imagine where ever your pump is, at 40*F you are not below the dew point.

  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 15,037
    No exposed metal surfaces when you wrap. Seal all the seams well.
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
  • PaulWojnicki
    PaulWojnicki Member Posts: 17
    From Grundfos PDF:
    http://us.grundfos.com/content/dam/GPU/Products/ALPHA/GPLALTL001.pdf

    " Liquid temperature:
    +36 °F (+2 °C) to +230 °F (+110 °C).
    To avoid condensation in the control box and
    stator, the liquid temperature must always be
    higher than the ambient temperature."

    I will wrap it up tight.
    Thank You
  • ratio
    ratio Member Posts: 2,932
    Keep in mind that the Armaflex will need to come off for any kind of work to be performed or settings adjusted. Also, should anything start to leak, if it's sealed up completely it will fill up with water before it forces it's way out. Wrap the body in such a way that you can fabricate a cover that will slide down over the motor & overlap on the body. As long as there are no gaps where air can circulate it should be fine. Do watch the temp on the motor, I would expect the chilled glycol to keep things cool but it's possible the motor/controls could overheat. IDK, never done this before.

    The secret to good looking Armaflex is a SHARP knife & good scissors. I use a new razor blade in my knife every time.

  • PaulWojnicki
    PaulWojnicki Member Posts: 17
    Yes Sir, I'm guessing as long as a lot of air can't flow near the pump, condensation can't form in or around the pump. I'll make sure nothing can flood the good parts of the pump.
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 15,037
    GEO circ pumps are built a bit different from standard hydronic pumps. The electronics and motors are designed for operation with fluids to -10C according to Grundfos data.

    Many of the common sized hydronic circs are available as GEO versions, but typically they are 230V.

    Remember also, with ECM circs, the electronics need to be able to cool as some of the PWM versions have heat sinks built into the covers, so don't insulate over the control box in that case.
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
  • In some chilled water applications, wet rotor circs (including ECM) might sweat inside the stator housing, the reason we all have small "condensate drain holes" at 3:00, 6:00, 9:00 and 12:00 positions where the stator housing meets up to the volute. We all approve low water temps with an exception where the fluid temp is below the ambient temp.

    One exception - our 007e and VR 1816 use an encapsulated winding/stator meaning there is not air gap in the stator, hence no stator sweating.

    Won't comment on insulating the entire pump other than is the condensate drain holes are covered up the stator may flood, causing water to come in contact with electrical connections, releasing the magic smoke.
    Dave H_2aircooled81Rich_49
  • PaulWojnicki
    PaulWojnicki Member Posts: 17
    System been running 3 years now. I guess it was to dry in the basement to cause any condensation, thank you anyway.