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Heating and insulating an enclosed exterior deck

Wally3433Wally3433 Posts: 4Member
I am enclosing a small 15 foot by 10 foot exterior deck.

The deck is constructed with treated lumber.

I have an exposed deck with joists and deck boards above my area as well as below my area.

I am closing off the three exposed sides of my deck with easy Breeze Windows which are made of clear vinyl.

I am sure that if I provide a heat Source in the winter the vinyl will retain some of the Heat but not much.

My question is would I reduce my heat loss enough to Warrant installing insulation into the ceiling above and the Joyce structure below my floor.

If so what type of insulation would you recommend for this application

Comments

  • SWEISWEI Posts: 7,356Member
    In short, yes. Insulation almost always provides the second-best ROI of any energy retrofit (with air sealing being the first.)

    A couple of key questions before we can make any kind of suggestion on the best materials with which to insulate: How are the ceiling and roof detailed? Once you are done, is there any chance the deck will see moisture? If so, would it come from above or from below?
  • Wally3433Wally3433 Posts: 4Member
    There will be moisture from above and below.

    It's a condo deck structure, and my unit has a deck above and two feet of open air below (and then the ground).

    I am installing an aluminum ceiling system to keep the water out of my patio from above. My thought was to install some insulation prior to that aluminum ceiling going in.

    Similar scenario below - I have a joist system that I could insulate. This wouldn't see as much water/snow but still would be "in the elements".

    Lastly, the vinyl EZE Breeze windows are not glass, but instead made of flexible clear vinyl. Again, they will retain some heat if I provide a source, but not much.

    I will try to post a picture if I can figure that out.
  • Wally3433Wally3433 Posts: 4Member
    Hard to describe, but these pics should help much more to give you an idea of what I am working on. Thanks for any advice.
  • ratioratio Posts: 1,566Member
    Perhaps a patio heater might work for you? I don't know if there are restrictions regarding overhead distances to flammables, but it might be something to check out.
  • SWEISWEI Posts: 7,356Member
    Do you have access to the ceiling of the unit below? I would dense-pack cellulose or fiberglass into the joist bays, then perhaps add an inch or so of XPS (or similarly-rated EPS) sheet foam. Sheet foam inside the panels under the railing. Cover it all with cement board or MgO board or something equally bulletproof. Mind your condensate and drip/drain lines.
  • hot rodhot rod Posts: 8,616Member
    Occasional use?

    Seems like it will be expensive to keep it heated with all that vinyl window area. Is it worth the $$ to insulate the top and bottom with so much exposed window area?

    The patio heaters that Ratio mentioned are great for occasional use. I have sat outside in Chicago, mid winter under those heaters for dinner and been comfortable. Although the top of my head got awful warm :)

    Maybe leave it open and just use the nation heaters when you are out there. really depends on how you plan on using the space, I suppose.
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    The magic is in hydronics, and hydronics is in me
  • JeffMJeffM Posts: 165Member
    The deck above you isn't enclosed, so unless their floor decking is sealed tight plank-to-plank some amount of moisture will be able to get into the ceiling insulation of your space. Don't plan on using any type of insulation that absorbs moisture.
  • JUGHNEJUGHNE Posts: 4,558Member
    Are most deck boards installed with spacing for water to pass and the edges of the planks to dry out?

    So this is a nasty scenario I cooked up because I have been a landlord for over 30 years. For instance; the people above you have a dog or cat......it is late at night and a long way down to the grass. So pet is allowed to just "go" outside on the deck because the rain will wash it away. Not really, it just drips down to your deck or you may never know because it is pooling up on the top side of your insulation.
    Or worse yet the estranged husband locked out of the apartment by the wife. He goes out and drinks a barrel of beer and comes to her door and hoses down (wizzes) on her front door to display his discontent with her. Can't imagine than happening? Some relationships turn around in days.

    I would put some type of your own roof above your deck. It would need to slope out to drain. Just dirt from the upper deck will eventually perhaps interfere with the drainage.
    Where is this located? The patio heater sounds pretty practical.
  • GordyGordy Posts: 8,029Member
    There is options. However you have to plan for worst case scenario. @JUGHNE high lighted a few....

    I'm thinking space heater is the best option with the least expense. Patio heaters are great. However of enclosed CO becomes an issue. Screen it in. Make it three Season. You would not even need to insulate with a patio heater.
  • Paul48Paul48 Posts: 4,492Member
    Wow......The condo association is OK with such radical changes to the exterior?
  • ChrisJChrisJ Posts: 9,051Member
    Paul48 said:

    Wow......The condo association is OK with such radical changes to the exterior?

    They haven't found out yet.
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • Paul48Paul48 Posts: 4,492Member
    Most condos won't even let you paint your front door a different color.
  • ChrisJChrisJ Posts: 9,051Member
    Paul48 said:

    Most condos won't even let you paint your front door a different color.

    We lived in an apartment complex and all curtains had to be white on the window side, forget about painting anything visible.
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • JUGHNEJUGHNE Posts: 4,558Member
    Apartments that I have been would allow only white drapes on the window side of sliding glass patio doors. The solar gain would be too much for the glass and some have shattered if I understand the logic behind it.
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